Chris Cornell’s history of drug abuse swept under carpet by deranged Benzo Buddies kooks screaming justice

Chris Cornell’s Family Sues Psychiatrist over Ativan
« on: November 01, 2018, 09:30:25 pm »

[Buddie]

Justice
https://variety.com/2018/music/news/chris-cornell-widow-files-malpractice-suit-soundgarden-1203017603/

Admin might need to move this but not sure where it goes.

Re: Chris Cornell’s Family Sues Psychiatrist over Ativan
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2018, 09:46:27 pm »

[Buddie]

imo, attorneys sue where ever there is a chance for monetary settlement. cornell’s wife knew he was taking lorazepam, he told her on the phone shortly before his death that he had taken a few extra doses. why didn’t she/he take appropriate actions in regard to his addiction/drug seeking behavior before his death? the rx’s written to him (940 mg over 20 months) are about 1.5 mg/day, not an excessive dosage. the toxicology autopsy report indicated 4 mg lorazepam, barbiturates (where did he get these?), and other substances. yes, suicide ideation is a symptom associated with benzodiazepines but not any more so for cornell than for you or i. as i said imo, the attorney is seeking monetary settlement for a celebrity’s estate but, such action would likely not be brought by the estate of an average person.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2018, 10:46:35 pm by [Buddie] »

Re: Chris Cornell’s Family Sues Psychiatrist over Ativan
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2018, 09:58:01 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on November 01, 2018, 09:46:27 pm
imo, attorneys sue where ever there is a chance for monetary settlement. cornell’s wife knew he was taking lorazepam, he told her on the phone shortly before his death that he had taken a few extra doses. why didn’t she/he take appropriate actions in regard to his addiction/drug seeking behavior before his death? the rx’s written to him (980 mg over 20 months) are about 1.6 mg/day, not an excessive dosage. the toxicology autopsy report indicated 4 mg lorazepam, barbiturates (where did he get these?), and other substances. yes, suicide ideation is a symptom associated with benzodiazepines but not any more so for cornell than for you or i. as i said imo, the attorney is seeking monetary settlement for a celebrity’s estate but, such action would likely not be brought by the estate of an average person.
Can we please just enjoy the fact that someone is being held accountable and it’s making the news?

Re: Chris Cornell’s Family Sues Psychiatrist over Ativan
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2018, 10:00:49 pm »

[Buddie]

enjoy if you want, but it may make it more difficult for those that are still alive & depend upon benzodiazepines for what ever legitimate purposes they use them or may need them in the future. also, I believe they are suing cornell’s treating physician, a cardiologist, not a psychiatrist: Dr. Robert Koblin is a cardiologist in Beverly Hills, California.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2018, 10:39:47 pm by [Buddie] »

A short history of Cornell's drug abuse

Turnbridge

Chris Cornell had long struggled with drug abuse and addiction. He started using around age 12, and by the time he was 13-years-old, he had become a daily drug user – of pot, pills, or whatever was easily accessible at the time. When he was just 14, Chris Cornell had a bad experience with PCP (a dangerous hallucinogen) and wound up with a longer-lasting panic disorder – agoraphobia. For the two years following that experience, Cornell rarely talked to anyone and did not have any friends. He had debilitating flashbacks of his PCP trip and stayed home most of the time. He became depressed.

Though Cornell stayed away from hard drugs for years after that, he drank heavily from adolescence to his late thirties. He was the child of two alcoholics and felt his own drinking problem was nearly inevitable. In a 2006 interview with SPIN magazine, Cornell explained that it was alcohol that eventually led him back to drug abuse:

“I think alcohol is what leads you to everything, because it takes away the fear. The worst drug experimentation I ever did was because I was drunk and didn’t care.” By everything, Chris Cornell primarily meant prescription medications. When things got hard at home, he hit the bottle and took some pills, leading him to an even more severe state of depression and addiction.

Wikipedia

In a 2006 interview, Cornell revealed that at the age of 14, he had a bad PCP experience and suffered from panic disorder and agoraphobia. “I had a bad PCP [angel dust] experience when I was 14 and I got panic disorder. And of course, I wasn’t telling anyone the truth. It’s not like you go to your dad or your doctor and say, ‘Yeah, I smoked PCP and I’m having a bad time.’ So I became more or less agoraphobic because I’d have flashbacks. From 14 to 16, I didn’t have any friends. I stayed home most of the time. Up till then life was pretty great. The world was big and I felt I could do anything I wanted. Suddenly, I felt like I couldn’t do anything. But in the isolation, my imagination really had time to run. I never did any drugs until my late 20s. Unfortunately, being a child of two alcoholics, I started drinking a lot, and that’s what eventually got me back into drugs. You often hear that pot leads to harder drugs. But I think alcohol is what leads you to everything, because it takes away the fear. The worst drug experimentation I ever did was because I was drunk and didn’t care.”

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