Renegade Benzo Buddies member “benzojunkie” posts horrific image of his benzo belly, lets loose torrent of saliva

Post-withdrawal Recovery Support / Re: Dry Mouth
« on: August 06, 2014, 01:43:59 pm »

benzojunkie

just the opposite…. drooling like a wolf eye balling a doe. a doe who’s sleeping in the snow…i have to change my pillow case every day as i wake up drenched in saliva spray.. the lower in dosage i get, the more things around me get wet. if i turn my head real fast, local objects get a blast. forget about my constant burping. now it seems to be never ending slurping….

JONESTOWN

7 WAYS BENZO BUDDIES HURTS DRUG ADDICTS

  1. Benzo Buddies may suggest criminal or sexually abnormal ideas: attending cult urine drinking orgies, hurting oneself and/or a medical professional, pill seeking, mental rape, illegally trading drugs with other “buddies”, drugged driving, going against doctor’s orders, stealing for drugs, doctor shopping, etc.
  2. Benzo Buddies creates a mental preparedness or readiness for temptation: forced readings of the cult’s Bible – the Ashton manual, cult lingo (benzo belly, benzo brain, benzo flu, taper, protracted, wave/window) that enforces group think.
  3. Benzo Buddies suggests the forms a delinquent impulse may take and supply details of the latest techniques for its execution: providing unsupervised and harmful Ashton taper plans, organized cult attacks on doctors.
  4. Benzo Buddies may tip the scales in the behavior of an otherwise normal addict and act as the precipitating factor of delinquency or emotional disorder: causes more severe mental illness masked by denial of the existence of mental illness, seeks to control every aspect of member’s offline/online life.
  5. Benzo Buddies supplies the rationalization for a contemplated act which is often more important than the impulse itself: promotion of the Scientology cult’s beliefs, “we’re right, all doctors/psychiatrists but Ashton are wrong” etc.
  6. Benzo Buddies sets off a chain of undesirable and harmful thinking: feelings of doom, suicidal impulses, micro-tapering for decades, mass psychogenic illness (MPI), fear of butter.
  7. Benzo Buddies creates for the addict an atmosphere of deceit, trickery and cruelty.

BENZO BELLY NIGHTMARE INDUCES ‘FEAR OF ROLAIDS’

Upset Benzo Belly. What do you use to feel better?
« on: May 16, 2014, 12:13:03 am »

[Buddie]

I dont know if this nausea is from my last cut, its a new sx for me. Maybe just upset stomach but Im hurting.
What is safe to use? Can we take a simple anti acid like rolaids??? Or will it interact somehow. Seems everything does!

Re: Upset Benzo Belly. What do you use to feel better?
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2014, 12:34:14 am »

[Buddie]

I take pepto, marshmallow root and slippery elm for upset gastro issues. Ginger tea works well too – use fresh ginger.

Kooky Monday: Someone/something pulling from inside addict’s stomach

Bellybutton/naval pain. Weird
« on: April 22, 2014, 08:04:55 pm »

[Buddie]

Hi all. I am a little over a month of being benzo free. All in all in feeling good besides a few bumps in the road but that is to be expected. But this threw me for a loop.

I have been having not quite a pain but more like a discomfort right behind by bellybutton, almost like someone is pulling or stretching it back from the inside and it goes all the way down. It is not constant, just comes and goes especially when I stretch. I’ve been to the doc before and show not a darn thing wrong with me anywhere except for acid reflux and IBS. Has anyone else experienced this?

DOES HOPE-FIEND HAVE A FATAL CASE OF BENZO BELLY?

WINDOWS

CULT LINGO: WAVES & WINDOWS

Thought-stopping language

Thought-terminating clichés and slogans

Cults have lots of slogans and thought-stopping clichés, and cults have their own language with plenty of redefined words. This is one of Dr. Robert J. Lifton’s eight criteria for a “thought reform“, or “brainwashing” program.

Slogans are handy because they can condense whole pages of dogma into snappy one-liners which are easy to remember and easy to repeat.

Slogans are effective tools for stopping thought. When a simplistic slogan is the answer, there just isn’t much more to be said on the subject.

A few examples of slogans Benzo Buddies uses to stop their members from thinking:

  • “I’m in a wave”
  • “I have benzo belly”
  • “Welcome to Benzo Buddies”
  • “The Ashton Manual says…”
  • “This is my longest window”
  • “I have benzo brain”
  • “You’ll find a lot of information and support here”
  • “Dr. Ashton is an expert in the field”
  • “Our families don’t understand us”
  • “This is the best forum in the world”
  • “I’m protracted”
  • “Ashton says”
  • “The Ashton Manual is an authoritative source”
  • “Doctors are idiots”
  • “Microtapers work”
  • “Save us Bliss”
  • “I haven’t had a window in months”
  • “MSG makes me twitch”
  • “Create a signature”
  • “Colin knows best”

The above kinds of slogans are also known as “thought-stopping clichés.”

Dr. Robert J. Lifton, the author of the classic study of Chinese Communist brainwashing, Thought Reform and the Psychology of Totalism: A Study of ‘Brainwashing’ in China, said that thought-terminating clichés constrict, rather than expand, human understanding. When the cult controls language, it also controls what people can think, because words are the tools we use for thought. And such jargon has the advantage (to the cult) that non-members simply cannot comprehend what cult members are really talking about. This further isolates the cult members, and makes them feel that nobody but another cult member really understands.

Slogans can also codify ideas which don’t work well in other formats: For example, Hitler’s “Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Führer!” sound bite (translation: “One people, one empire, one leader!”) wouldn’t have the same zing if it were a long essay, especially because it is actually an irrational emotional appeal to the people to abandon democracy and embrace a fascist dictatorship. Hitler wrote in Mein Kampf that the average voter could not handle any idea that took more than two sentences to express, and for best results, the idea should be expressed in six words or less. Hence all of his short slogans.

All propaganda must be popular and its intellectual level must be adjusted to the most limited intelligence among those it is addressed to. Consequently, the greater the mass it is intended to reach, the lower its purely intellectual level will have to be. But if, as in propaganda for sticking out a war, the aim is to influence a whole people, we must avoid excessive intellectual demands on our public, and too much caution cannot be exerted in this direction.

The more modest its intellectual ballast, the more exclusively it takes into consideration the emotions of the masses, the more effective it will be.

It is a mistake to make propaganda many-sided, like scientific instruction, for instance.

The receptivity of the great masses is very limited, their intelligence is small, but their power of forgetting is enormous. In consequence of these facts, all effective propaganda must be limited to a very few points and must harp on these in slogans until the last member of the public understands what you want him to understand by your slogan.
Mein Kampf, Adolf Hitler, pages 180-181.

What are so called WInDOWS?
« on: February 20, 2014, 07:29:52 pm »

[Buddie]

I will be 4months off klonopin in the next couple days and have been wondering about these windows. I have moments where I am totally just spent and cant do much of anything. Then there are days where i am just okay but have very intrusive thoughts that just plague every moment of my day. I also find it hard and very frustrating to enjoy ANYTHING. Anyways I was just wondering if these symptoms stay around till I you “turn the corner”. Any one suffering through benzo withdrawal my heart goes out to you and I do relate with a lot of what is being said on here. Hope this doesn’t last much longer.  

Re: What are so called WInDOWS?
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2014, 07:59:50 pm »

[Buddie]

A “window” is a moment of clarity. It can be a few seconds, a few minutes, hours, or even days. It really depends on the individual and how their recovery is going. On the opposite end of the spectrum are “waves,” which are periods of intense unpleasantness, in which one feels almost as if they are back in acute w/d. Again, the intensity and symptoms accompanying a “wave” are similar to a “window,” in that the length can be hours, days or weeks and the intensity varies from person to person. It’s not uncommon for some people to “cycle” through “windows” and “waves” in the same day (It is quite common when you’re bipolar. – editor) Both are signs that healing is occurring. Even the worst wave is to be appreciated in a way, as it’s a sign that there is some healing activity taking place. I spent 6-7 weeks on an “emotional plateau,” where everything was emotionally flat, with no real waves or windows. I think my body and brain used that period to rest up and recuperate. I’m back in a wave now and I know at some point it will fade and a window will follow. It seems as if after each cycle of waves and windows my “baseline” recovery level increases ever so much. At some point I think windows and waves will simply cease and I’ll not notice it for a while until one day it hits me that “all this crap is finally over and I’m healed.” I looking forward to that day! At six months, it’s probably at least another six months or more away… (I used benzos for 15+ years, so your recovery may be faster if you used for a shorter period of time. I think long-term, regular users seem to take longer to fully recover. We DO recover, it just takes longer…)

Re: What are so called WInDOWS?
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2014, 08:09:09 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on February 20, 2014, 07:59:50 pm A “window” is a moment of clarity. It can be a few seconds, a few minutes, hours, or even days. It really depends on the individual and how their recovery is going. On the opposite end of the spectrum are “waves,” which are periods of intense unpleasantness, in which one feels almost as if they are back in acute w/d. Again, the intensity and symptoms accompanying a “wave” are similar to a “window,” in that the length can be hours, days or weeks and the intensity varies from person to person. It’s not uncommon for some people to “cycle” through “windows” and “waves” in the same day. Both are signs that healing is occurring. Even the worst wave is to be appreciated in a way, as it’s a sign that there is some healing activity taking place. I spent 6-7 weeks on an “emotional plateau,” where everything was emotionally flat, with no real waves or windows. I think my body and brain used that period to rest up and recuperate. I’m back in a wave now and I know at some point it will fade and a window will follow. It seems as if after each cycle of waves and windows my “baseline” recovery level increases ever so much. At some point I think windows and waves will simply cease and I’ll not notice it for a while until one day it hits me that “all this crap is finally over and I’m healed.” I looking forward to that day! At six months, it’s probably at least another six months or more away… (I used benzos for 15+ years, so your recovery may be faster if you used for a shorter period of time. I think long-term, regular users seem to take longer to fully recover. We DO recover, it just takes longer…)

I guess I am yet to really see any windows just waves and feel like I have been flat through most of this process.  thanks for the information you have shared with me. I really hope i doesn’t take me a whole year to get some what back to a normal feeling. Congrats on six months its a rough ride for sure hopefully your symptoms have gone down some in the last 6months. Just looking forward to when my healing will begin and not try to get caught up in how far away it is.

Re: What are so called WInDOWS?
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2014, 08:13:38 pm »

[Buddie]

Your “signature block” doesn’t say how long you were on benzos, just how much you c/t’d from. Some more details about your length of use would be helpful… Hang in there. Four months was a turning point for me. I found I began to lose momentum, emotionally, because the first 4 months or so I was so heavily invested in getting through this. That’s kind of when my “emotional plateau” began. I think at some point your body and brain just need a break and they’ll decide when to take it easy. Your experience, of course, may be totally different. Everyone that sticks this out seems to heal, they just take different journeys and different lengths of time to get to the same destination: “healed.”

Re: What are so called WInDOWS?
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2014, 08:20:19 pm »

[Buddie]

I took benzos for about 2years and 1year of that was every day. Most people would say I was a benzo abuser but I had no idea the real harm that was to come from taking these. urgh what a nightmare. I feel like everyday is a battle just to make it to the next day only to wake up in a shear panic. 

Re: What are so called WInDOWS?
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2014, 08:47:50 pm »

[Buddie]

[...], Yes, it is a nightmare…don’t beat yourself up about what’s behind you but look forward instead. Every day is a step closer to being well again. And you will be well again. It’s better to accept the process and the process is simply this: your central nervous system is temporarily extremely sensitive and it takes awhile to repair itself. [...] 

Re: What are so called WInDOWS?
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2014, 12:29:40 am »

[Buddie]

Hey if you knew that the withdrawal was this bad you would not have taken them at all doesn’t matter if you abused them or not. It is what it is, like Ray Lewis says in the new xbox commercial don’t trip on what’s behind you