Disclaimer at Benzo Buddies worthless, doctor bashing goes on 24/7

UK psychiatrist for over 20 years was an imposter
« on: November 19, 2018, 02:52:37 pm »

[Buddie]

I thought I was beyond being shocked, but this is utterly appalling. How could any doctor possibly get away with this?

https://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/17230748.doctor-who-faked-will-of-west-cumbrian-widow-led-life-of-deception/?fbclid=IwAR1ltxJl_YktpwNptw5Qo2ZlXsCPD61k0JctQ7EHW2Wle6IaTHhDlsyuGnE

Panicky Benzo Buddies leader tries (and fails) to calm his rabid anti-psychiatry flock

Re: Are we telling people the wrong thing ?
« Reply #118 on: November 08, 2018, 03:15:37 pm »

Colin

This thread is veering far off course now.

There are a couple of points I’d like to address. First of all, everyone agreed to follow rules and policies when joining the forum. This includes being careful with profanity. There are people who are sensitive to the use of profanity and while we don’t edit out each and every occurrence, mostly due to the fact we have a small team to moderate a large forum, it is important to post in a manner than is acceptable by all.

http://www.benzobuddies.org/forum/index.php?topic=108145.0

Please do not post profanity – disguised or otherwise – at this forum. Members will have differing sensitivities to the use of swear words, so it is better to avoid their use altogether. The use of profanity can also contribute to a less calm atmosphere. If a swear word is mild and infrequent, or if the member is particularly upset at the time, we might choose to let the rule infraction go unchallenged. Do not take any such examples of such leniency as a green light to post more of the same.

Secondly, we are not an anti-benzo, anti-doctor, anti-medical profession forum (LOL – Editor). There is a place and a need for medicine and doctors in this world. While some of us, perhaps many, have been subject to inferior medical care, your comments should only refer to your particular instance and not generally debase the entire medical profession.

I know a little boy very well that is still undergoing periodic chemotherapy sessions to make certain his cancer stays in remission. Where would he be without this care?

Anti-doctor, Anti-psychiatrist and Anti-medicine Comments

Whilst some of our members report negative experiences with doctors, psychiatrists, or the wider medical profession, and although we do not wish to outlaw comments about how members feel let down or mistreated in their personal medical care, you are not permitted to use this community as a platform to spread general anti-doctor or anti-psychiatry propaganda. Nor should you, unless you are posting a recommendation, name those involved in your healthcare.

Please read the referenced links for more information.

Colin

Benzo Buddies: There isn’t a person on the face of the earth that needs an AD

Re: Are we telling people the wrong thing ?
« Reply #43 on: November 02, 2018, 10:58:53 pm »

[Buddie]

There isn’t a person on the face of the earth that “needs” an AD. It isn’t air or food or water.

Honestly I don’t think a lot of people understand that like benzos, AD’s don’t cure anything, they can be every bit as dangerous as benzos and when you take them you are taking a big risk with your health.

I understand some people might be at the end of their rope and in those cases it might be an option to consider but in my opinion that is the only justifiable reason to take them. I would suggest anyone who is considering it to do lots of research and weigh their options very carefully.

Chris Cornell’s history of drug abuse swept under carpet by deranged Benzo Buddies kooks screaming justice

Chris Cornell’s Family Sues Psychiatrist over Ativan
« on: November 01, 2018, 09:30:25 pm »

[Buddie]

Justice
https://variety.com/2018/music/news/chris-cornell-widow-files-malpractice-suit-soundgarden-1203017603/

Admin might need to move this but not sure where it goes.

Re: Chris Cornell’s Family Sues Psychiatrist over Ativan
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2018, 09:46:27 pm »

[Buddie]

imo, attorneys sue where ever there is a chance for monetary settlement. cornell’s wife knew he was taking lorazepam, he told her on the phone shortly before his death that he had taken a few extra doses. why didn’t she/he take appropriate actions in regard to his addiction/drug seeking behavior before his death? the rx’s written to him (940 mg over 20 months) are about 1.5 mg/day, not an excessive dosage. the toxicology autopsy report indicated 4 mg lorazepam, barbiturates (where did he get these?), and other substances. yes, suicide ideation is a symptom associated with benzodiazepines but not any more so for cornell than for you or i. as i said imo, the attorney is seeking monetary settlement for a celebrity’s estate but, such action would likely not be brought by the estate of an average person.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2018, 10:46:35 pm by [Buddie] »

Re: Chris Cornell’s Family Sues Psychiatrist over Ativan
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2018, 09:58:01 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on November 01, 2018, 09:46:27 pm
imo, attorneys sue where ever there is a chance for monetary settlement. cornell’s wife knew he was taking lorazepam, he told her on the phone shortly before his death that he had taken a few extra doses. why didn’t she/he take appropriate actions in regard to his addiction/drug seeking behavior before his death? the rx’s written to him (980 mg over 20 months) are about 1.6 mg/day, not an excessive dosage. the toxicology autopsy report indicated 4 mg lorazepam, barbiturates (where did he get these?), and other substances. yes, suicide ideation is a symptom associated with benzodiazepines but not any more so for cornell than for you or i. as i said imo, the attorney is seeking monetary settlement for a celebrity’s estate but, such action would likely not be brought by the estate of an average person.
Can we please just enjoy the fact that someone is being held accountable and it’s making the news?

Re: Chris Cornell’s Family Sues Psychiatrist over Ativan
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2018, 10:00:49 pm »

[Buddie]

enjoy if you want, but it may make it more difficult for those that are still alive & depend upon benzodiazepines for what ever legitimate purposes they use them or may need them in the future. also, I believe they are suing cornell’s treating physician, a cardiologist, not a psychiatrist: Dr. Robert Koblin is a cardiologist in Beverly Hills, California.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2018, 10:39:47 pm by [Buddie] »

A short history of Cornell's drug abuse

Turnbridge

Chris Cornell had long struggled with drug abuse and addiction. He started using around age 12, and by the time he was 13-years-old, he had become a daily drug user – of pot, pills, or whatever was easily accessible at the time. When he was just 14, Chris Cornell had a bad experience with PCP (a dangerous hallucinogen) and wound up with a longer-lasting panic disorder – agoraphobia. For the two years following that experience, Cornell rarely talked to anyone and did not have any friends. He had debilitating flashbacks of his PCP trip and stayed home most of the time. He became depressed.

Though Cornell stayed away from hard drugs for years after that, he drank heavily from adolescence to his late thirties. He was the child of two alcoholics and felt his own drinking problem was nearly inevitable. In a 2006 interview with SPIN magazine, Cornell explained that it was alcohol that eventually led him back to drug abuse:

“I think alcohol is what leads you to everything, because it takes away the fear. The worst drug experimentation I ever did was because I was drunk and didn’t care.” By everything, Chris Cornell primarily meant prescription medications. When things got hard at home, he hit the bottle and took some pills, leading him to an even more severe state of depression and addiction.

Wikipedia

In a 2006 interview, Cornell revealed that at the age of 14, he had a bad PCP experience and suffered from panic disorder and agoraphobia. “I had a bad PCP [angel dust] experience when I was 14 and I got panic disorder. And of course, I wasn’t telling anyone the truth. It’s not like you go to your dad or your doctor and say, ‘Yeah, I smoked PCP and I’m having a bad time.’ So I became more or less agoraphobic because I’d have flashbacks. From 14 to 16, I didn’t have any friends. I stayed home most of the time. Up till then life was pretty great. The world was big and I felt I could do anything I wanted. Suddenly, I felt like I couldn’t do anything. But in the isolation, my imagination really had time to run. I never did any drugs until my late 20s. Unfortunately, being a child of two alcoholics, I started drinking a lot, and that’s what eventually got me back into drugs. You often hear that pot leads to harder drugs. But I think alcohol is what leads you to everything, because it takes away the fear. The worst drug experimentation I ever did was because I was drunk and didn’t care.”

Anti-psychiatry haven Benzo Buddies compares hospitals to prisons, warns members to stay away

Psych and detox facilities
« on: September 01, 2018, 01:53:44 am »

[Buddie]

I am watching Orange is the new black when I can, and cannot shake the feeling that American psych hospitals and (possibly, don’t have any experience with those) detox facilities are way too similar to prisons.

How you cannot leave the facilities, or have much of your personal stuff, phones, even a kindle, how visitation is limited, how you have this ancient wall phone, how you are treated like a child, how your complaints are ignored, how you are stuck with medications they think are best for you and not given what you need (I was refused my asthma inhaler once, despite wheezing!!!), how the food is awful and without much regard to your food sensitivities, how you are forced to the social activities. Some places it’s even physically dangerous, because they mix violent manic patients with detox patients.

Re: Psych and detox facilities
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2018, 02:49:37 am »

[Buddie]

Hi,

Although I’ve never been in a mental hospital, I have been to a voluntary hospital detox, sent there by a well meaning but clueless doctor to get off xanax. It was only 4 days, but it was awful. I don’t recommend this to anyone. Far from being an “easy” way to get off benzos, as some seem to think, it’s literally going from the frying pan into the fire for most of us who’ve experienced it:

Nine years ago, I went to a major Seattle hospital for “detox” where the doctor was supposed to be a “benzo expert.” He wasn’t, and I only saw him for a few minutes the whole time. All they did was cold turkey me off a high dose of xanax, feed me, and monitor my blood pressure for 4 days. I was the only benzo person on a floor full of alcoholics, and there was NO follow up treatment or counseling. Price: $16,000 (2009). Afterwards, I had hellish relentless symptoms that never stopped. These were so bad that I reinstated 4 months later, only to taper off a few years later. I’d kindled by then, and it 2.5 years for me to heal.

One thing, and I say this from my own experience. It might be better to limit watching tv shows or movies that disturb you. We tend to be extremely emotional and suggestible during withdrawal, and it’s often best to limit our exposure to such upsetting things. That’s what I did, and it helped. I focused on positive distractions like classic movies, audible books, spirituality, art, crafts, and short trips and walks out of the house. Anything that took my mind of my suffering for a little while,

:smitten:

Re: Psych and detox facilities
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2018, 03:35:09 am »

[Buddie]

Oh my gosh, your detox experience sounds horrible!

I’ve had that too, though, at regular hospitals: monitor blood pressure for several hours, and charge a thousand or two for it.

I’ve been bed ridden for 10 months, so I’ve watched all the feel good shows already. If you can recommend anything particular, that’d be great!

Re: Psych and detox facilities
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2018, 05:30:52 am »

[Buddie]

In my opinion….Detox centers are a waste of time and money. I could of done the same CT to me at home and had more money in my pocket. The pain and suffering would of been the same. The aftermath of what you experience when you leave a detox center is horrific. Your in a lot of pain searching for answers. I highly advise against it.

Re: Psych and detox facilities
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2018, 06:43:34 am »

[Buddie]

Yes. I wish doctors were not leaving their patients hanging and cutting them off, thereby forcing these dangerous detox situations. The revival of the market for the benzos had already happened in a big way in the last 10-15 years, and there is no backing out of it just like that, right now. What was prescribed needs to be carefully and slowly de-prescribed.