Addict fantasizes about murdering family after joining Benzo Buddies anti-doctor cult

Fear of Going Home
« on: May 08, 2019, 09:36:08 pm »

[Buddie]

I’m having a really hard time wanting to go home after work. I feel anger toward my family and have intrusive thoughts. I’ve had these things for so long that I’ve formed an aversion to my home. Don’t know what to do at this point. Never thought this would happen at nearly 14 months off. Does anybody have this? Does this sound like benzo withdrawal at all? I may have to quit my job and move at this point.

Re: Fear of Going Home
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2019, 10:01:47 pm »

[Buddie]

Yeah, I think you begin to associate all this horror with your home, and family, and job, and everything around you, and you feel like getting away from it all. I used to hate being at home. I’d just get in the car and drive around the mountains for the whole day. Anything to get away. Of course, if you have a lot of anger, you might not want to go driving around. Might turn into road rage. But maybe some long walks might help.

Re: Fear of Going Home
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2019, 12:32:14 am »

[Buddie]

You might have some other psychological issues (LOL – editor). This is not a criticism but your posts suggest it and your benzo doses were never very high. Maybe some cognitive behavioral therapy to help you deal with these negative thought patterns. Quitting your job and moving wont change a thing in my opinion. Best of luck.

Re: Fear of Going Home
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2019, 02:05:35 am »

[Buddie]

Been seeing a therapist since July. I started seeing a second therapist in April too. Nothing has helped.

All I know is that when I quit benzos the second time I didn’t sleep for a full month and it felt like I was going into states of psychosis. I had suicidal ideation up to about a year off. That has eased off and it’s morphed into this fear of going home and fear and anger around other people, particularly my family.

Benzo Buddies: Doctors are killing us

Benzos are only one tentacle of the beast
« on: April 19, 2019, 01:24:28 am »

[Buddie]

I have known for years that conventional diet “wisdom” is mostly nonsense but recently I have been been doing a lot of research on the keto diet and come to find out there are some doctors out there who are waking up to the fact that their med school education is at best inadequate and worst case it can have serious negative consequences (including death) to patient’s health.

I have listened to a few podcasts with Dr. Ken Berry He lays out the case for how conventional dietary advice that is sanctioned by many (most?) western governments and the medical establishment is effectively killing people. It’s scary how wrong they are about a fundamental health issue but it just goes to show that benzos are only the tip of the iceberg. If they are making us fat and unhealthy with bogus dietary advice and pushing drug after drug on us to mask the symptoms, what else is there that we need to be paying attention to?

We simply cannot take anything for granted, especially when it comes to our health and well being.

Here is a dicussion between Dr. Berry and a PA who is also clued in about the diet thing. Some very interesting information about how doctors are constrained by “common practice” making it very difficult to provide patients with information and treatment that goes against the orthodoxy. Very relevant to the benzo discussion.

Benzo Buddies member’s photo revealed: devoted to brutal micro-taper, addict eats by attaching food to fan and having it blow into her mouth

Benzo Buddies claims it isn’t anti-psychiatry yet attacks psychiatry every single day

Psychiatry's Incurable Hubris
« on: March 21, 2019, 05:11:09 pm »

[Buddie]

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/04/mind-fixers-anne-harrington/583228/

Quote
From ice baths to Prozac, each development Harrington describes was touted by its originators and adherents as the next great thing—and not without reason. Some people really did emerge from an insulin coma without their delusions; some people really are roused from profound and disabling depressions by a round of electroconvulsive therapy or by antidepressant drugs. But in every case, the treatment came first, often by accident, and the explanation never came at all. The pathological basis of almost all mental disorders remains as unknown today as it was in 1886—unsurprising, given that the brain turns out to be one of the most complex objects in the universe. Even as psychiatrists prescribe a widening variety of treatments, none of them can say exactly why any of these biological therapies work.

Re: Psychiatry’s Incurable Hubris
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2019, 05:29:37 pm »

[Buddie]

Another interesting article that was linked from the other one-

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/05/the-real-problems-with-psychiatry/275371/

Re: Psychiatry's Incurable Hubris
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2019, 09:01:03 pm »

[Buddie]

Then there is the idea that an entity as ‘mental illness’ exists. Hard to grasp. Like the flue ?

That some things are not mentally healthy is a different matter.

The pharmaceutical industry has been pumping money in the education of doctors and psychiatrists alike, and with success. My guess is that it will stop at some point. Who will pay for all of that ? The iatrogenic burden will simply become too great.

Re: Psychiatry's Incurable Hubris
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2019, 04:08:05 am »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on March 21, 2019, 09:01:03 pm
Then there is the idea that an entity as ‘mental illness’ exists. Hard to grasp. Like the flue ?

Mental variations exist. Mental illnesses? Maybe things like schizophrenia could be considered an “illness”, but when the DSM starts categorizing normal masculinity and internet use as “mental illnesses” it’s easy to see how slippery that slope is.

The more illnesses you invent the more office visits you can charge for and the more drugs you can sell. Create the demand by pathologizing normal human behavior. What a great business concept!

Anti-doctor maniacs at Benzo Buddies terrify member into believing her doctor is wrong

Wine
« on: March 17, 2019, 11:41:27 pm »

[Buddie]

I am not a drinker generally but I used to like a glass of wine years ago. Lately I have thought I would like a taste of wine. Today it was beautiful out and we went to an outdoor cafe. I had a small glass of riesling. I feel like my withdrawal symptoms settled down a bit. Much more relaxed. has anybody experienced this sense of calm with a bit of wine?

Re: Wine
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2019, 05:02:25 am »

[Buddie]

Ever heard of the term….”liquid benzo”?

Re: Wine
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2019, 11:57:37 am »

[Buddie]

No I haven’t. The clinical director of my residential program said a few sips of red wine are healthy. I have only had a few sips and would never have more. I like a few tastes but nothing more.

Re: Wine
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2019, 01:58:52 pm »

[Buddie]

Please be really careful when it comes to alcohol. I keep reading on this forum that it can cause major setbacks. You may be OK with small amounts, but in my opinion it’s not worth the risk. Best to avoid alcohol, caffeine and sugar. I personally may not ever drink again! Happy healing to you …

Re: Wine
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2019, 06:27:56 pm »

[Buddie]

I’m at the end of my taper, five more days to jump. I had a small glass of prosseco last Saturday and it gave me tachycardia, I had to take a propranolol, and have felt lousy the last two days.

Re: Wine
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2019, 10:23:57 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on March 18, 2019, 11:57:37 am
No I haven’t. The clinical director of my residential program said a few sips of red wine are healthy. I have only had a few sips and would never have more. I like a few tastes but nothing more.

Well unfortunatelyT. Yes, red wine has some health benefits for those that have not had their CNS fried by psych drugs. Alcohol affects the Gabba receptors similiar to benzodiazepines and it is strongly advised to avoid alcohol until you are well and truly healed. Some say 6 mths and some say 2 years after you have completely healed, not just finished taper but completely healed.

So this is probably why you felt relaxed, like the effects of swallowing a benzo?

Re: Wine
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2019, 10:27:54 am »

[Buddie]

[…],
It sure looks that way for me.
When I was in the middle of my taper a glass of prosseco was fine, but now with the tachycardia I can’t touch alcohol. I want to take 10 milligrams of propranolol only when it is absolutely necessary, I’ve only taken it this once. All this symptoms are very tiresome.
Thanks.

Suicidal member begs for help from anti-psychiatry ghouls

HELP PLESEE PLEASE PLEASE AKATHISIA
« on: January 26, 2019, 10:27:38 pm »

PinkGlitter

Internal external all of it. Pure HELL mental HELL WANT TO DIE NOW HOW DO YOU COPE NEED TO TALK TO SOEMOEN ASAP PLEASE VERY VERY VERY SUICIDAL NOT GOING MAKE IT PLESSE PLEASE HELP