Safe and effective Ativan helps prevent suicides

Ativan (and its generic version, lorazepam) is an extremely common drug, prescribed to millions of people every year, says Asher Simon, MD, assistant professor of psychiatry at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. And overall, he says, “it can be an incredibly effective and very safe medication.”

It’s in a class of drugs called benzodiazepines, which work by slowing down the central nervous system and enhancing certain chemicals in the brain to produce a calming effect. (Other well-known benzodiazepines include Valium and Xanax.) The drug is usually prescribed on a short-term basis for the treatment of anxiety, and is often helpful for people with depression.

“It lasts about four to six hours, and a lot of times it’s prescribed on an as-needed basis,” says Dr. Simon. “We might say, ‘Take one or two pills three times a day, as needed.’” The drug starts working right away, he says; that’s why they’re sometimes recommended for people who are anxious about flying on airplanes or visiting the dentist, for example.

Ativan might also be prescribed for short-term use alongside antidepressant medications. “A lot of times when someone comes in with anxiety and you start them on an antidepressant, their anxiety can get worse before it gets better,” says Dr. Simon. “So sometimes they need a couple weeks of an anti-anxiety medication to provide immediate relief, until the antidepressant kicks in.”

Because it’s a sedative, Ativan can make people dizzy and tired when they first start taking it. It can increase the risk of falls, especially in older people, and patients are warned about driving or operating heavy machinery until they know how the drug will affect them.

But Dr. Simon says that taking an extra Ativan or two would not cause slurring or serious impairment, especially for people who have been on the drug long-term and developed a tolerance to its sedating side effects. “Yes, of course you should never take more than prescribed,” he says. “But one or two additional pills is usually not a huge deal.”

Combining Ativan with alcohol or other drugs, is much more dangerous, he says—mostly because of the potential for impaired judgment and slowed breathing and heart rate. There’s less of a chance that Ativan would cause a non-suicidal person to take their own life, says Dr. Simon. “A lot of suicide comes at a time of acute anxiety, and if it treats the anxiety it can actually prevent those suicides,” he says. “It is extremely unlikely to cause suicidal thinking in and of itself.”

http://www.bostonherald.com/lifestyle/health/2017/05/chris_cornell_s_family_thinks_ativan_may_have_played_role_in_his_suicide

IN PRAISE OF VALIUM

Medical uses

Diazepam tablets (2, 5, and 10 mg)

Diazepam is mainly used to treat anxiety, insomnia, panic attacks and symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal. It is also used as a premedication for inducing sedation, anxiolysis, or amnesia before certain medical procedures (e.g., endoscopy).[11][12] Diazepam is the drug of choice for treating benzodiazepine dependence with its long half-life allowing easier dose reduction. Benzodiazepines have a relatively low toxicity in overdose.[7]

Diazepam has a number of uses including:

Dosages should be determined on an individual basis, depending on the condition being treated, severity of symptoms, patient body weight, and any other conditions the person may have.[18]

Seizures

Intravenous diazepam or lorazepam are first-line treatments for status epilepticus.[7][20] However, intravenous lorazepam has advantages over intravenous diazepam, including a higher rate of terminating seizures and a more prolonged anticonvulsant effect. Diazepam gel was better than placebo gel in reducing the risk of non-cessation of seizures.[21] Diazepam is rarely used for the long-term treatment of epilepsy because tolerance to its anticonvulsant effects usually develops within six to 12 months of treatment, effectively rendering it useless for that purpose.[18][22]

The anticonvulsant effects of diazepam can help in the treatment of seizures due to a drug overdose or chemical toxicity as a result of exposure to sarin, VX, or soman (or other organophosphatepoisons), lindane, chloroquine, physostigmine, or pyrethroids.[18][23]

It is sometimes used intermittently for the prevention of febrile seizures that may occur in children under five years of age.[7] This use, however, is not typically recommended as the benefits are small and side effects are common.[24] Long-term use of diazepam for the management of epilepsy is not recommended; however, a subgroup of individuals with treatment-resistant epilepsy benefit from long-term benzodiazepines, and for such individuals, clorazepate has been recommended due to its slower onset of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effects.[7]

Other

Diazepam is used for the emergency treatment of eclampsia, when IV magnesium sulfate and blood-pressure control measures have failed.[25][26] Benzodiazepines do not have any pain-relieving properties themselves, and are generally recommended to avoid in individuals with pain.[27] However, benzodiazepines such as diazepam can be used for their muscle-relaxant properties to alleviate pain caused by muscle spasms and various dystonias, including blepharospasm.[28][29] Tolerance often develops to the muscle relaxant effects of benzodiazepines such as diazepam.[30]Baclofen[31] or tizanidine is sometimes used as an alternative to diazepam.

Availability

Diazepam is marketed in over 500 brands throughout the world.[32] It is supplied in oral, injectable, inhalation, and rectal forms.[18][33][34]

The United States military employs a specialized diazepam preparation known as Convulsive Antidote, Nerve Agent (CANA), which contains diazepam. One CANA kit is typically issued to service members, along with three Mark I NAAK kits, when operating in circumstances where chemical weapons in the form of nerve agents are considered a potential hazard. Both of these kits deliver drugs using autoinjectors. They are intended for use in “buddy aid” or “self aid” administration of the drugs in the field prior to decontamination and delivery of the patient to definitive medical care.[35]

STOP THE KOOKS: MASSACHUSETTS

A revised benzo bill has been reintroduced into the Massachusetts legislature — HD.2918 An Act relative to benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics. They have six days to get co-sponsors for the bill.

I will be sending a detailed packet of information to all 160 members of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, detailing the cult’s ties to Scientology, threats to doctors, the cult danger to medical science, examples of their harassment of doctors (and other medical workers / pharma employees), screenshots, etc. and of the urgent need to protect patients from cult abuse.

I urge readers to do the same.

Contact info https://malegislature.gov/Legislators/Members/House

Kooky Monday: Potatoes contain diazepam

POTATOES contain DIAZEPAM !!! MOTHER NATURE is mad...
« on: March 12, 2017, 04:05:53 pm »

Hi All,
i put what i have read
is it true?? if YES i won’t eat potatoes anymore for years !!  

post @ poppies.org

“We must be talking the atropa alkaloids right? No….not really…in the last few years it was noticed that plants such as wheat and potatoes accumulated benzodiazepines…more recently it was demonstrated that sterile plant cultures (Solanum tuberosum and Artemesia dracunculus) are capable of synthesizing various 5-phenyl-1,4-benzodiazepines (the pharmacologically active type) including diazepam, N-desmethyldiazpam, delorazepam, delorazepam, lorazepam etc…(see Kavvadias et al, 2000 Biochem Biophys Res Comm 269:290) thus indicating that the plant (and not some bacterial or fungal contaminant) is producing these compounds. In this paper, they culture a number of plants in sterile conditions including potato (Solanum tuberosum) and French tarragon (Artemesia dracunculus) and then identified the presence of these compounds using benzodiazepine receptor assays (using brain membranes) and via preparative HPLC-ESI- MS/MS using known benzodiazepine standards for comparison. So it seems pretty certain that these plants really are producing these compounds (albeit in low amounts – for example temazepam was found at 100-450 ng/g FW in potato cultures). The pathway to these compounds is also totally unknown really…it has been suggested that a pathway similar to that found in penicillium leading to cyclopeptine and utilizing anthranilate, tyrosine and glycine to form the benzo skeleton is responsible for their formation at least in these fungi…i have my suspicions that the whole pathway is based on benzoic acid, glycine and anthranilate in plants however, with a mechanism similar to that used in the biosynthesis of tryptophan…anyways…

does anyone else want to put in their two cents on this?

can we start engineering potatoes to produce benzos?

Not that i really consider the benzos to be sacramental in anyway, but i don’t know what other forum to post this in…”

Kooky Monday: Benzo Buddies attacks Mad in America as being TOO anti-psychiatry

Re: "Big pharma MD's killed my father"
« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2017, 05:58:57 pm »

[Buddie]

My dad had the same symptoms as the dad posted here. He never takes drugs, and it was a hospital visit for dehydration that turned into pneumonia and he died. He was a doctor and always told me as a kid, if you want to kill yourself, just check into a hospital. So that warning turned out to be true. BTW, I believe he was beginning to suffer from Dementia even before he went to the ER…..And his wife was his advocate, as well as an NR. Sometimes I think MiA is bit much.

Re: "Big pharma MD's killed my father"
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2017, 08:30:47 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on March 04, 2017, 05:58:57 pm
My dad had the same symptoms as the dad posted here. He never takes drugs, and it was a hospital visit for dehydration that turned into pneumonia and he died. He was a doctor and always told me as a kid, if you want to kill yourself, just check into a hospital. So that warning turned out to be true. BTW, I believe he was beginning to suffer from Dementia even before he went to the ER…..And his wife was his advocate, as well as an NR. Sometimes I think MiA is bit much.

I concur. Sometimes MiA is way too much. There are a lot of professionals there speaking out about the dangers of these meds, but some of these professionals used to be conventional psychiatrists who prescribed a lot of these same medications in the past, and then got disillusioned with their field and adopted a different stance. It is good to see differing opinions, but this is all way too confusing to an average person in a situation like this. Some MiA articles sure cause a lot of cognitive dissonance in both doctors and patients. I guess, I just don’t like the absolutist stance on issues such as medications.

Heck, even Dr. Peter Breggin used to prescribe Librium during his psychiatric residency. Obviously, even he must have believed that psychopharmacology worked before he became medication skeptical…..

I notice a trend of a lot of antidepressant bashing over at the MiA. I wonder if that is because there is a little less stigma and controversy about antidepressants then about some other psychotropics. I don’t advocate antidepressant use, but I find it interesting how much antidepressant backlash there has been in the last 20 years, while the other meds were hardly being even mentioned. While so many were bashing Prozac and Zoloft, people were being prescribed Lamictal, Trileptal, Risperdal, Tegretol, Zyprexa, Ativan, Xanax, Klonopin, Gabapentin, Seroquel. Just saying…..

It makes me wonder how many people looked at the anti-depressant backlash, and kept thinking “Why should I take antidepressants when anti-anxiety meds have been there for years, and I am more anxious than depressed?” It is very easy to get into that sort of mindset. I think Robert Whitaker correctly points out that people are terribly confused about psych meds due to all these different schools of thought.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2017, 02:29:52 am by [Buddie] »

Kook petition for independent inquiry into benzodiazepines fails miserably

“The horrific life-destroying implications of benzodiazepines have been known about for decades and yet the medical profession remain largely in denial of the damage. The doctors are in denial not us. They conspired with Big Pharma to turn us into accidental addicts. Blah blah blah. The Department of Health, the BMA, and Parliament have a duty to give justice to those whose lives have been ruined. Blah blah. There must be an inquiry for the sake of future generations and for those undergoing the horrific consequences of this iatrogenically induced pandemic. Iatrogenic? Big word that means the doctors did it and we hate them. Pandemic? An epidemic of infectious disease that has spread throughout the world? Get a grip.”

https://www.change.org/p/health-select-committee-an-independent-inquiry-into-benzodiazepines

Even though it is a UK petition, signatures are being solicited, at secret online sites, not only from UK, but also from U.S. and Canadian, citizens. At last count they had 604 signatures. Their goal is 1000. One of the doctor-bashing groups claims to have over 1500 members but can’t even rouse a significant percentage of its members to sign the petition (they don’t have 1500 active members). Benzo Buddies claims 28,000 members but over 90% of the listed membership never posts, or has posted once, and ran from the site screaming (it is rumored Benzo Buddies even keeps deceased members on the membership rolls). If Benzo Buddies had that many members it would be very easy to get 5,000 of them to sign a petition that bashes doctors — some movement. It is as fake as their claims Big Pharma targeted them.

  • UK population 64 million
  • U.S. population 319 million
  • Canadian population 36 million

That is to say, out of a combined total population of 419 million only 604 people signed this garbage. What percentage is that? Pathetic is not even the right word to describe this.

Medication helps people live productive lives.