Kooks want to switch from benzos to LSD

CBC Radio: "Can psychedelic drugs work magic on depression?" e.g. ketamine, LSD
« on: March 25, 2017, 06:03:11 pm »

[Buddie]

“Quirks and Quarks” is CBC Radio’s science program, and today they talked about studies on ketamine, LSD and other psychedelics for mood disorders. You might not be able to listen to the program outside of Canada, but you can click on the link where it says “Listen” and see what happens. There’s also a condensed transcript of the section of the show where they discussed ketamine, so at the very least, you can read that.

http://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/psychedelic-drugs-and-depression-runaway-stars-bird-flu-battle-and-more-1.4036396/can-psychedelic-drugs-work-magic-on-depression-1.4036497

Kooks push intravenous ketamine

Recreational use of ketamine

Ketamine is a prescription anesthetic that is federally regulated (e.g., U.S. Schedule III, U.K. Class B) that functions as a dissociative anesthetic, and so has seen use as a recreational drug. Originating in the United States in the 1970s, the recreational use of ketamine has since spread to Europe, Canada, Asia, and Australia. Attempts are made to use the drug at sub-anesthetic doses; contexts for use include both private settings and at club venues (raves and parties), where it initially gained popularity. Despite its emergence as a club drug, users may eventually relegate their use to more private settings

Ketamine interacts with a variety of other drugs, most pronounced with alcohol, opioids (potentiation), and barbiturates, and with drugs that increase blood pressure (e.g., stimulants, SNRI antidepressants, and especially MAOIs). The latter may have an additive effect on the user’s blood pressure, causing tachycardia, palpitations and potentially serious arrhythmias.[not verified in body] Ketamine use as a recreational drug has been implicated in a small but greatly exaggerated number of annual deaths, the majority of which are youth or young adults, which have, taken together, led to increasing stringency of its regulation worldwide.

As a consequence of its drug interactions and adverse effects, including the ability to cause confusion and amnesia, and adverse reactions that occur during emergence from anaesthesia, some cases are known from the media that involved irresponsibly high dosages and accidents in people who were not prepared for the experience and/or took other drugs at the same time, despite ketamine being a physically very safe substance in comparison to other psychoactives like opioids or even alcohol. But ketamine can leave users vulnerable to date rape (i.e., because of the associated confusion and amnesia).

Due to the complexity of its chemical synthesis, ketamine supplies for recreation use must be diverted from licit medical sources, though there have been reports of industrial-scale illicit ketamine manufacture in China and India.

Effects

Mortality
Ketamine’s use as a recreational drug has contributed to more than 90 fatalities—the majority among young adults—in England and Wales in the years of 2005-2013, including accidental poisonings, drownings, and traffic accidents. This has led to its increasingly stringent regulation (e.g., upgrading ketamine from a Class C to a Class B banned substance in the U.K.).

Drug interactions
Ketamine may increase the effects of other sedatives, including, but not limited to: alcohols, benzodiazepines, opioids, and barbiturates. Other drugs which increase blood pressure may interact with ketamine, having an additive effect on blood pressure; such agents include stimulants, SNRI antidepressants, and MAOIs.[citation needed] Increase blood pressure and heart rate, palpitations, and arrhythmias may be potential effects.[citation needed]

Adverse reactions
Ketamine is generally safe even for those critically ill, when administered by trained medical professionals. The dosages used recreationally are somewhat lower than a fully anaesthetic dosage, making the substance physically relatively safe in comparison to other psychoactive drugs.[44] Still, even in these cases, there are known side effects that include one or more of the following:

  • Cardiovascular: abnormal heart rhythms, slow heart rate or fast heart rate, high blood pressure or low blood pressure; and
  • Central nervous system: increased intracranial pressure (ICP), leading to intracranial hypertension.

In addition there are dermatologic adverse reactions (ARs; transient erythema, transient morbilliform rash), gastrointestinal ARs (anorexia, nausea, increased salivation, vomiting), neuromuscular and skeletal ARs (Increased skeletal muscle tone, i.e., tonic-clonic movements), ocular ARs (double vision, increased intraocular pressure, nystagmus), respiratory ARs (airway obstruction, apnea, increased bronchial secretions, respiratory depression, laryngospasm), as well as local pain or exanthema (e.g., at injection sites) and possible anaphylaxis and dependence.

In 10-20% of patients at anesthetic doses, adverse reactions are experienced that occur during emergence from anesthesia, reactions that can manifest as seriously as hallucinations and delirium. These reactions may be less common in some patients subpopulations, and when administered intramuscularly, and can occur up to 24 hours postoperatively; the chance of this occurring can be reduced by minimizing stimulation to the patient during recovery and pretreating with a benzodiazepine, alongside a lower dose of ketamine. Patients who experience severe reactions may require treatment with a small dose of a short- or ultrashort-acting barbiturate.

Non-lethal manifestations

Ketamine produces effects similar to phencyclidine (PCP) and dextromethorphan (DXM). Unlike these other well-known dissociatives, ketamine is very short-acting, its hallucinatory effects lasting tens of minutes when inhaled (insufflated) or injected, and hours when ingested. With ketamine, intensities of hallucinations are dose-dependent. Like other dissociative anaesthetics, hallucinations caused by ketamine are fundamentally different from those caused by serotonergic psychedelic (classic) hallucinogens.

The specific dissociative state produced by ketamine is characterised by a sense of detachment from one’s physical body and the external world that is known as depersonalization and derealization. At sufficiently high doses, users may experience what is called the “K-hole”, a state of extreme dissociation with phenomenology of schizophrenia (e.g., visual and auditory hallucinations).

John C. Lilly, Marcia Moore and D. M. Turner (amongst others) have written extensively about their own entheogenic use of and psychonautic experiences with ketamine. Both Moore and Turner died prematurely (due to hypothermia and drowning respectively) during presumed unsupervised ketamine use.

Overdose management

As the recreational dosages used are always below the fully anaesthetic threshold and thus lower than those medically administered, the term ‘overdose’ needs to be seen a bit differentiated from other drugs. While with continued use, people may build up some degree of tolerance, leading to the use of higher dosages than medically advised, it is technically somewhat difficult to overdose on ketamine. An even higher dosage will just lead to full anaesthesia, amnesia, but no physical danger from the drug itself as long as the environment isn’t dangerous. The user will become catatonic when fully dissociated, not experiencing any pain but also unable to move his/her body.

There is no known effective antidote used to treat ketamine overdose, and treatment generally focuses on the maintenance of respiratory and circulatory function until the patient is capable of breathing under their own power and all cardiac abnormalities have subsided. Unlike many other anaesthetics, ketamine has a minimal effect on respiratory drive and tidal volume; while pulse oximetry is always essential it rarely drops enough to require mechanical ventilation or supplemental oxygen, except in the most massive of overdoses and in cases of mixed-drug-overdose.

Verbal reassurance and a calming environment (i.e. dim lights, calming music, and the presence of supportive individuals in the room) should be provided when possible to calm the patient and/or prophylacticly to prevent agitation. Occasionally it may become necessary to restrain highly agitated patients during recovery should they become violent, experience panic attacks, or otherwise present a threat to themselves or others.

Even after all vital signs have normalized and the patient appears functional it is advised to require the patient to be driven home as residual impairment of motor skills may persist for up to a day after apparent resolution.

Dependence

Ketamine’s potential for dependence has been established in various operant conditioning paradigms, including conditioned place preference and self-administration; further, rats demonstrate locomotor sensitization following repeated exposure to ketamine. Increased subjective feelings of ‘high’ have been observed in healthy human volunteers exposed to ketamine.[63] Additionally, the rapid onset of effects following smoking, insufflation, and/or intramuscular injection is thought to increase the drug’s recreational use potential. The short duration of effects promotes bingeing, tolerance can develop, and withdrawal symptoms, including anxiety, shaking, and palpitations, may be present in some daily users following cessation of use.

Due to its primary NMDA-antagonist effect, sudden withdrawal in severely addicted users will result in overexcitability, manifesting as increased sensitivity to stress, anxiety and pain. There are speculations about possible excitotoxicity resulting from the rebound surge in glutamate, but this has not yet been proven or disproven in humans and it doesn’t seem to be a huge concern in healthy adults. Unlike GABAergic sedatives however, overexcitation secondary to ketamine withdrawal is not life-threatening as long as no underlying seizure disorders are present and even very tolerant users will likely suffer, at worst, only minor neurological sequela following the abrupt discontinuation of the drug. Some titration or the administration of anti-excitatory agents like memantine could be of benefit.

Ketamine can cause a variety of urinary tract problems that are more likely to occur with heavier and/or higher dosed use, especially in those not watching for a healthy lifestyle, according to a UK study.

See also: K-Hole (“K-hole” is a slang term for the subjective state of dissociation from the body commonly experienced after sufficiently high doses of the dissociative anesthetic ketamine. This state may mimic the experiences such as catatonic schizophrenia, out-of-body experiences (OBEs) or near-death experiences (NDEs), and is often accompanied by feelings of extreme derealization, depersonalization and disorientation, as well as temporary memory loss and vivid hallucinations.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recreational_use_of_ketamine

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ketamine

TALES OF MADNESS

This strange little Benzo story of mine.
« on: July 28, 2016, 05:49:52 am »

[Buddie]

Hey there, Buddies 

First of; I just want to say that I didn’t realize that this board was mainly for Benzo withdrawal, which I hear is one of the worst drug withdrawals you can go through. I just googled something and found a forum called Benzobuddies. I figured it was aimed at Benzodiazepine fans, users and abusers alike… But now I see, however, that it was not the case haha 😛

Secondly; I just want to give you guys going through Benzo withdrawal my nicest and most pleasant feelings and thoughts. What you’re doing, no matter how you got there, is something that I wish I had the strength for. If I ever landed in the deep end of the Benzo pool, I’d choose another way out instead of fighting it, because I’m not as strong a person as one would think when looking at me.

I guess I’m just lucky that what happened to me thought me never to touch these things again as long as I live. My refusal to ever ingest a Benzo again even got to that point that I refused all sedative drugs when in the Psychiatric Hospital, not because I didn’t need them, I sure as hell did, I just didn’t want to go psychotic ever again. The doctors thinking I was bullshitting them with this Benzo story of mine because it’s not a well known fact that you can in fact go psychotic from using Benzos. Even if it’s just a tiny dose, for the first time and you’re not either a child or the elderly.

Now to that little post of mine…

I’m here to look for some reassurances, answers and to introduce to you guys a new angle to this whole Benzo thing.

That angle being; I believe that Benzodiazepines triggered my underlying Schizophrenia.

I’m very big about this whole mental health thing and believe that if it makes you better, why not? If it makes you worse, stay away from it!

It’s been pointed out to me that excessive cursing is a no-no here so I’ll try to edit most of it out, aside from those curses that I use for emphasis, those are pretty damn important to just get how massive this whole thing was for me. Life shattering is one way to put it.

So, As I said, I believe, and have I gotten a confirmation from one of the most revered psychiatrists in my country, which so happens to be my personal psychiatrist, which says that I’m not that far from the truth about this whole thing, that a Benzodiazepine called Xanax not only induced my first episode psychosis but also, somehow, triggered my Schizophrenia.

So, I was prescribed Xanax in the beginning of May 2014 and not 40 minutes, the time it takes the pill to dissolve and get into your system, after first ingestion, I entered a gnarly psychotic episode that lasted for the two weeks I took the damn drug, only ending the day after I stopped taking it, resulting in the greatest couple of days in my life…

Those couple of days, however, were the best of my life, but short were they. As soon as they ended I started becoming psychotic 2-4 times a week. It was truly awful. Each one was like those two weeks pushed into one day.

Hardcore hallucinations that encouraged homicide, suicide and self harm. Raging delusions that made me believe the most raging and extremely Paranoid things. Derealization and Depersonalization along with everything.

So, my BenzoBuddies, I entered those episodes 2-4 times a week for the eighteen months after those initial two weeks.

I had, of course, before being put on the Xanax, entered Psychotic episodes before. But, they never were a problem. I, of course, didn’t know what they were or why I was having these crazy intrusive thoughts and strong as shit ideas about all sorts of crazy things. I didn’t have the vocabulary or the trust in others to tell anyone about these episodes as I was just a small child.

This one time it happened on a plane, the voices and delusions had convinced me to open the door of the plane mid air and jump out. That I’d survive the fall too.

I just cowered in fear and entered the fetal position, not knowing what was happening. Then 15 years old.

But again, they weren’t ever a problem or as frequent until the Xanax.

So my fully functional theory is that when I was born I entered something called the prodromal phase of Schizophrenia as soon as I developed consciousness, as I remember every single negative symptom of the Schizophrenia I have today from my childhood.

Much like this. http://mentalhealth.com/mag1/scz/sb-prod.html

I entered the first phase as I started noticing I wasn’t like other kids. As soon as my parents noticed I wasn’t like other kids, I entered phase two.

Phase three, however, didn’t appear until some 16-18 years later or when I was about to turn 20, the summer of 2013, when I started feeling my first positive symptoms. Paranoia. Coming up at the most untimely times. And it only exacerbated the paranoia whenever I got stressed or enjoyed some lovely other stressors.

Then, instead of my parents noticing my paranoia or some other symptom that had appeared by then, I took the Xanax and that stuff threw me over phase 4 and 5 and just way beyond everything.

I wish to believe that if I hadn’t taken the Xanax, I would have developed some other fun old psychotic symptom and gotten “used” to it like I had with the paranoia, my parent noticing there was something more wrong with me perhaps a couple of years later and I’d entered my first major psychotic episode, the one that would’ve triggered the Schizophrenia, a few years later. Maybe in 2016, 2018 or 2020….. Maybe I should have gotten this shit through fate when I would’ve been 26 or in 2019…

I believe that me taking the Xanax was both a blessing and a curse. As it did absolutely nothing for me if we’re talking about Anxiety but caused me an extreme psychotic episode. The blessing was that I later found out what was wrong with me, what those strange feelings and behaviors I experienced as a child were and there was finally some reason for why I felt like the crap I usually feel like. The curse was that I self harmed and almost resorted to suicide which I’m not gonna go into detail with.

If I’d been allowed to experience this “first major” episode of mine in peace in ~2018, maybe it wouldn’t have hit me as hard. I could have gotten “used” to the symptoms. And when I say used to I mean that they wouldn’t have fucked me as hard up as they did.

Now I’m of course, and you might have read it, not saying that the Xanax caused the Schizophrenia like I thought at first. It simply jump-started it.

My body made a listing on Kickstarter and pledged $2 for the initial goal of the project. The project being psychosis and the goal being Schizophrenia. And one pill of 0.5 mg Xanax was enough to fill the goal instead as $2 is roughly the street value of one 0.5 mg Xanax.

For you disbelievers, you can too enter psychosis from Benzodiazepines, it simply being called Agitated Toxic Psychosis. Google-Scholar it, bro.

In my case, I believe my Agitated part manifested itself deep down in my consciousness during my psychotic episode. As I was so terrified by the Derealization and Depersonalization that those symptoms masked those Agitated feelings that the voices, delusions and paranoia fed on for the duration of those two weeks. The Hallucinations and Delusions mainly revolving around killings, whether it was my self or others and self harm.

I may be terrible at school, but I’m terrific thinking out of the triangle, putting crap together and making theories that make more than sense. And much to my surprise, my psychiatrist strongly agrees with my theories, and it’s not just to shut me up. He’s more professional than to actually do that. He’s been cruelly frank with me in the past and he’d sure as hell tell the shit out of me if I wasn’t making any sense and was deluding myself.

Does this sound familiar to anyone? Anyone here that’s experienced psychosis from Xanax or any other Benzodiazepine or are some Schizophrenics here that have noticed something strange from Benzodiazepine use? I’m open for all stories if there’s anything about psychosis, depression or any other mental disorder directly related to Benzodiazepine use! 

If there’s interest, I’ll write down everything that happened those two weeks, skipping the most graphic parts of course as they’re not well seen by the mods here which I completely understand. Suicides and self harm can trigger all sorts of feelings in sick individuals, plus, it’s just not very pleasant to read about or relive in one’s mind.

DISCLAIMER: What happened to me, experiencing psychosis from a drug that’s used to treat psychosis, is what’s called a Paradoxical Reaction. Paradoxical Reactions can happen from any drugs but are extremely rare, yet somehow more frequent with Benzos than with other drugs. It’s said that 5% of all Benzodiazepine users on this little planet of ours will experience Paradoxical Reactions from Benzodiazepines at one point in their lives. These reactions are most common with children, the elderly, in high doses and with abuse.
While none of those things relates to me, it can quite well happen, to anyone, anywhere, from any medication, for any reason. That it’s gonna happen to you is still highly unlikely and if you were gonna feel these Paradoxical Reactions, odds are you would have felt them by now. They can, not only, come out as Psychosis but also stress, anxiety and agitation. Benzo Rage, ever heard of it? That’s a Paradoxical Reaction as well.
Again, and I cant stress this enough, it’s highly, unrealistically, unlikely that this will ever happen to you and is my post not some sort of fear mongering aimed at regular folks for the sole purpose of making them paranoid that what they’re ingesting might cause them to go insane. I do not wish in any way to exacerbate anyone’s Benzo induced paranoia or uneasiness with this babble of mine. I’m just here looking for some answers!
I’ve researched it extensively and it looks like that this is one of the first of these cases in the world. That is that a Benzo might have triggered Schizophrenia. So you have nothing to worry about, absolutely nothing to worry about.

Thanks for reading this Subway foot-long! I actually like Quiznos better… Baja Chicken wrap with fries? Oh god yes, I would sell my soul right now for one of those!

Have a nice day, everyone! And could someone tell me what’s up with this guy?  Is he having some sort of seizure? I feel like what you have to type to make this guy  Should be switched with this strange seizure guy… But that’s just me 

 

“I feel naked, mutilated, out of control and entirely in limbo”

Low-dose klonopin taper, psychiatric cocktail, hypersensitivity, irregular reactions, etc.
« on: August 02, 2016, 06:32:20 pm »

[Buddie]

Hi there. My family (historically subject to alcoholism, autism, bipolar disorder, clinical depression, you name it) and I have been trying to properly medicate my depression/mood swings/anxiety since I was just a kid.

After a failed diagnostic trial with Lamictal around age 10, I was put on 25mg Zoloft and 0.25mg Klonopin in middle school: this combination successfully got me through the following 5-6 years. I essentially cold-turkeyed the low dose of Klonopin upon exiting highschool and didn’t notice any effects. Switched from Zoloft to Prozac, which aggravated my mood swings and prompted a switch to Viibryd after a couple months. Varying degrees of depression/hypomania/crippling depression throughout. Had an odd reaction to Viibryd, and was put back on 0.25mg of Klonopin twice daily by my long-time psychiatrist to ease the SSRI withdrawal.

Things worsened rapidly, and after two consecutive, incredibly irrational trials on Lithium and then Seroquel (taking Klonopin and hydroxyzine throughout to ease the insanity of my symptoms) made the decision to get off medication completely and take the naturopathic route. This is after years of treating my chemically frustrated brain medically, mind you.

Started my Klonopin taper with 0.25mg in the morning and then 0.125mg at night. Been at this for about two weeks. My supplements are 5-MTHF (I have the homozygous mutation), GABA, vitamins B & D, and omega-3s. Haven’t noticed their effects, or lack thereof. My withdrawal symptoms include fatigue, confusion, dizziness, blurred vision, general cognitive impairment, body aches, and most importantly, anxiety & panic attacks. I read a little bit about hitting “tolerance” but am otherwise entirely blindsided by my neural reaction to the tapering. I’ve found myself literally cowering in fear half the time. I’m positively hungry to be back on an SSRI, because the past month has been something out of a horror film. For someone who is normally very aware/reflective/fluent, the mental fog that I’ve been subject to feels like paralysis. I am terrified. To make things worse, I’m at a critical nexus in my academic career and am paranoid about sabotaging my progress, capacity, future, etc. because I’ve only just realized how serious my Klonopin withdrawal is. My mental faculties are INCREDIBLY limited, and for someone who’s identified as an scholar since childhood, it’s tearing me apart. Rereading this uncoordinated, poorly written post is almost comedic considering my career as a university academic and publishing success.

All of my previous medications have been tiny doses because of my extreme sensitivity. xxx I have very few resources and am in urgent need of advice, information, and support. Currently, I’m supposed to travel overseas in two days and am wondering if it’s safe to get back on an SSRI to ease my symptomatic (& figurative) paralysis. Please, please, please help.

Stevie Nicks snorted so much cocaine she burned a hole in her nose but Klonopin is more deadly than coke? Does Stevie have brain damage from drug abuse?

Stevie Nicks’ $1 million cocaine habit, fueled by her wild affair with married Mick Fleetwood, burned a hole in her nose so big she took the drug through her private parts, reveals new book

  • Fleetwood Mac singer Stevie Nicks was so addicted to cocaine, alcohol and Quaaludes she blacked out and nearly overdosed repeatedly
  • She wore gold and turquoise bottle inlaid with diamonds around her neck so she was never without coke
  • To avoid body searches by customs in Europe, they hired Hitler’s private rail car complete with the elderly attendant who served the Fuhrer
She quickly descended into drug hell and became addicted to cocaine, alcohol, Quaaludes to sleep, and cigarettes – until her system broke down and she started having nosebleeds, falls on stage, blackouts and near overdoses.
She bought $1 million worth of cocaine and it burned a hole in her nose the size of a dime. Rumors spread that she had to have the drug blown up her derriere by an assistant.
“There was no way to get off the white horse and I didn’t want to,” the now 66-year-old Nicks said. “I was the worst drug addict.”
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2941749/Stevie-Nicks-1million-cocaine-habit-fueled-wild-affair-married-Mick-Fleetwood-burned-hole-nose-big-took-drug-private-parts-reveals-new-book.html
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2912497/I-worst-drug-addict-Stevie-Nicks-recalls-cocaine-habit-discusses-dating-60-Rolling-Stone.html

Stevie Nicks: Drug addict not anti-benzo apostle

Stevie Nicks’ $1 million cocaine habit, fueled by her wild affair with married Mick Fleetwood, burned a hole in her nose so big she took the drug through her private parts, reveals new book

  • Fleetwood Mac singer Stevie Nicks was so addicted to cocaine, alcohol and Quaaludes she blacked out and nearly overdosed repeatedly
  • She wore gold and turquoise bottle inlaid with diamonds around her neck so she was never without coke
  • To avoid body searches by customs in Europe, they hired Hitler’s private rail car complete with the elderly attendant who served the Fuhrer

She quickly descended into drug hell and became addicted to cocaine, alcohol, Quaaludes to sleep, and cigarettes – until her system broke down and she started having nosebleeds, falls on stage, blackouts and near overdoses.

She bought $1 million worth of cocaine and it burned a hole in her nose the size of a dime. Rumors spread that she had to have the drug blown up her derriere by an assistant.

“There was no way to get off the white horse and I didn’t want to,” the now 66-year-old Nicks said. “I was the worst drug addict.”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2941749/Stevie-Nicks-1million-cocaine-habit-fueled-wild-affair-married-Mick-Fleetwood-burned-hole-nose-big-took-drug-private-parts-reveals-new-book.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2912497/I-worst-drug-addict-Stevie-Nicks-recalls-cocaine-habit-discusses-dating-60-Rolling-Stone.html

Xanax abuse (not use) a growing problem

GOLDEN VALLEY, Minn. – It may not get as much headlines as prescription painkillers and heroin, but Xanax can be just as addictive and deadly for some, experts say. The drug recently made headlines after news the University of Minnesota police were investigating members of the wrestling team for abusing the drug. It is a medication used to reduce anxiety, but too much of it, especially mixed with something else can be dangerous.

“The first time I felt it, I was just hooked immediately,” said Chris, 24. He says he was 16 or 17 when he he tried Xanax for the first time. “I loved it. I loved the high,” he recalled, describing the high similar to being drunk.. Searching to fit in at a new school in Lakeville, he found the answer in the drug also known as Benzodiazepine. “It’s completely destroyed my life. I was stealing from family members, I almost died twice within a year period,” he said. He almost died after overdosing on the drug. He says a friend took him to the hospital. And then a few months later he says he blacked out while driving. “I swerved off the road and crashed at 70 miles an hour. Luckily I wasn’t hurt though,” he said.

Drug experts say the medication has been around for a while.

“It doesn’t really capture the headlines to the extent opiates and heroin do, but it’s certainly been around for a long time,” said Carol Falkowski of Drug Abuse Dialogues. Falkowski has tracked drug abuse for decades. In her latest drug trends report, she found that it is the second most prescribed drug seized by police. The Minnesota Department of Health also reports an increase of deaths related to Benzodiazepines. “We have seen an increase of prescribing for all sorts of drugs, so it’s logical to expect an increase in abuse,” she said.

Chris says he saw an increase in the use of Benzodiazepine among his friends in the south metro as recent as last year. “The medicine has a proper use but people abusing it is happening more and more,” he said. He has left that world behind, now in recovery at Minnesota Adult and Teen Challenge. He credits the treatment and his faith in Christianity that helped him to become sober. He says he’s grateful he’s alive to warn others of his mistakes. “It can cost you your life,” he said.

http://www.kare11.com/news/xanax-abuse-a-growing-problem/218407949