Kooky Monday: “Benzo withdrawal causes acne”

Acne breakouts during rapid taper
« on: April 03, 2017, 12:42:59 pm »

[Buddie]

Hi buddies,
I’m 2 months in on a forced rapid taper of valium & have 2 more months to go before I hit 0. I have suffered from acne since I was about 13 years old~it started out as cystic acne & has unfortunately left a lot of scarring. It continued throughout my 20’s then started clearing up when I was about 32. Before I started my taper I was having some hormonal issues & my acne resurfaced~but this time as mainly very oily skin, blackheads, & a smattering of pimples around that time of the month. However, about 5 weeks into my taper my skin started to get extremely oily & I started getting lots of pimples. Yesterday a cyst surfaced on my chin ? I haven’t had cystic acne since I was a teenager! It’s so embarrassing. Does anyone know if benzo withdrawal & acne are related? My guess is that since the withdrawal symptoms pretty much encompass every part of our bodies, I wouldn’t be surprised if it messes with our hormones as well. Has anyone else experienced this symptom? & when will it go away? I have enough to worry about what with all the symptoms I’m already having that cystic acne is the LAST thing I need! Thank you to everyone in advance & I hope everyone has a good start to the week ?

Four years later, cult still panicked over Matt Samet’s relapse

“So perhaps you’re wondering, once a year, or two, or three go by off benzos or antidepressants or antipsychotics or whatever chemicals have been foisted on you, will you still have to be vigilant or can you dive fully back into your ‘old life’ again? Can you pound coffee or smoke weed or drink socially, or have a stressful job or commute, or eat foods with lots of MSG and not blow out, not have a setback? Can you overextend yourself physically or mentally or emotionally without incurring ‘the wrath’?” – Matt Same

“I only passingly flirted with psych meds myself but I did a fair and regular share of weed, coffee, alcohol, psychedelics, and the occasional benzo, opiate, and even friends’ neuroleptics (to help me sleep off binges) for several years.” – Matthew Cohen

Re: How is it possible Matt Samet had a setback???
« Reply #97 on: March 20, 2017, 09:10:18 am »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on December 02, 2013, 01:15:38 pm
I have a guess. A guess is all it is, so please don’t jump on me. It is possible that his relapse was not what he says it was. He might have an underlying condition that led to his initial benzo use, and has now reared its ugly head again.

He would have us believe that his healed nervous system was so fragile that seven years of abuse crashed it again. That’s a possibility, but I can think of other things that might also explain it.

Obviously I don’t know. But why should we all get freaked out and worried that we will never truly recover 100% and will always have this hanging over our heads if we drink too much coffee? As long as it’s possible that his problem was not simply a return to withdrawal seven years later, why should we worry about it?

I don’t think Matt Samet did the benzo community any favors by scaring the hell out of us. As long as there are other possibilities, I choose to ignore Matt Samet’s claim that we never really recover from benzo use. On average, I’m sure we are not all like Matt Samet.

Matt Samett has written about smoking marijuana and this is a HUGE no no when it comes to the post benzo brain. Marijuana is like taking a sledge hammer to your brain’s GABA receptors. The caffeine probably didn’t do him any favors, but caffiene wont reset you back to square one benzo withdrawal. Alcohol and pot however will launch u back into benzo withdrawal.

As for Matt’s claim that we never fully recover…he’s eight. We heal and gain back the ability to live our lives but the regenerated GABA receptors are fragile and genetically different than the original ones we were born with. One smack to these fragile receptors and ur right back in hell

Anti-doctor Benzo Buddies monsters try to talk member out of going to the ER

Please help headed to ER no sleep 13 days
« on: January 14, 2017, 07:38:07 pm »

[Buddie]

I cant go on like this what is safe to let them give me? Advice please soo scared!!

Re: Please help headed to ER no sleep 13 days
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2017, 08:09:07 pm »

[Buddie]

Wow, 13 days is a long time, but unless you were up out of bed moving around the whole time you probably were getting periods of light sleep that you were not aware of.

I totally understand your desire to head off to the ER. I live just down the street from an ER and many were the nights that I wanted to run on over in desperation. Just know that ERs are all about stabilization and immediate symptom relief. They tend to be overworked and probably will want to give you a powerful sleeping aid so they can move on to the next person in line. You don’t want that. If they admit you to the hospital you will be pumped full of the same drugs and be knocked right back to where you started.

If you have not already tried any of them, you can try Trazadone, Remeron or Seroquel to help with sleep. You can just see or call your regular doctor to get a prescription. Otherwise, stay away from driving and other potentially dangerous activities and put in your time in bed (if only for badly needed rest) and sleep will find you eventually. In spite of your fears, you will not die from this. You will fall asleep before that happens.

YouTube benzo videos terrify cult members

I saw scary videos on youtube. Are they true?
« on: December 29, 2016, 12:34:46 am »

[Buddie]

I am about to begin my liquid taper of klonopin this week. I went online to see how other people were doing it just for some pointers and some of the people on youtube make titration sound like it is impossible. One person on there who posted alot looks like she is about to die. Please tell me she is just nuts. This was very discouraging and it scared the h#### out of me.

Panic breaks out as cult high priestess Perseverance flees Benzo Buddies

Searching for Perseverance
« on: December 02, 2016, 07:56:41 pm »

[Buddie]

Hi All,

I have introduced myself here before as the director/producer of As Prescribed, a documentary (in production) about the benzodiazepine scourge. I find BB member […]’s theories about benzos to be compelling, and would like to contact her. Does anybody know her? I believe that she is based in Maine. I don’t think she visits BB much anymore, but I would not be surprised if some current members know how to reach her. If so, I’d be enormously grateful. And if you have additional questions of me before sharing contact information, please PM me here, or email me at hollyhardman88@gmail.com.

Thanks!
Holly

Re: Searching for Perseverance
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2016, 08:53:54 pm »

[Buddie]

I have no idea how to contact her, but just wanted to say that I agree with you about […]’s work. Her research was top quality. I’d say the ‘glutamate theory’ is the best one we have right now.

Re: Searching for Perseverance
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2016, 08:58:29 pm »

[Buddie]

Hi […],

I haven’t seen her active here in some time; if she is still set to allow PMs, you could contact her that way and it will go to her email if that’s still valid.

Good luck.

Mad in America promoting LSD?

“There is no denying that psychedelic medicines offer potential for healing beyond the reaches of talk therapy. But their tremendous healing potential carries with it equal capacity for abuse. Beyond my own experiences, history supports this view — whether it be the LSD trials of the CIA, Ewan Cameron’s thought control experiments, or the current spate of sexual abuse and iatrogenic harms pertaining to ayahuasca and other realms of psychedelic tourism. The intimacy of my first-hand involvement in the Phase II clinical trial for MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treatment-resistant PTSD weighs heavily against my desire to challenge every facet of this approach.”

https://www.madinamerica.com/2016/10/psychedelic-series-1-mountain/

Benzo Buddies mind control games drives kooks to fear sleep

Help Please! Afraid to fall asleep
« on: October 22, 2016, 11:20:09 am »

[Buddie]

Now things have morphed for me into being afraid to fall asleep for some unknown stupid reason. I alm in a constant state of panic which makes loss of sleep even worse but can’t sleep as I feel like I am “trapped” What can I do. I can’t survive much longer like this. I try to talk myself out of it, but it doesn’t work…constantly bombarded with fear and panic 24/7. So hard to function w/o much sleep. Help need words of advice and encouragement. Please…Please….Please Will this go away? How do I live when I am afraid and feel trapped all the time.

TWELVE PAGES OF SHOWER HYSTERIA

The Benzo Buddies-induced hysteria goes on for TWELVE pages… (yes, twelve pages)

Showering?
« on: September 15, 2016, 06:26:41 pm »

[Buddie]

I’ve seen many posts where folks say they fear showering or dread it. I’m one of those folks. I tense up and am afraid I’ll fall. I totally have a melt down before and during. Is there a physiological reason. Why it’s so scary? Just trying to understand maybe that will help me come to terms with the process. Thanks.

Re: Showering?
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2016, 06:38:33 pm »

[Buddie]

Your central nervous system is raw, and a shower is quite a sensory overload in that situation both in terms of noise and physical sensation. Plus you’re standing up naked, which isn’t anything we normally think about, but leaves people feeling quite exposed when in WD.
I find a bath can be a good and more relaxing alternative.

Re: Showering?
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2016, 06:44:26 pm »

[Buddie]

Interesting. Thank you. I used to take baths but I’m too weak to get in and out of the tub. Thank you.

Kooks fear mouthwash

Mouth wash! Ever had any issues?
« on: August 06, 2016, 01:10:25 am »

[Buddie]

I am trying to clean my mouth before applying a temporary filling . Most mouthwash have alcohol in them . I won’t be drinking it but is it safe to use without revving up symptom ?

Cult superstar Perseverance called to account for fear-mongering

PERSEVERANCE: WHAT EXACTLY ARE YOU TRYING TO ACCOMPLISH IN YOUR POSTS?
« on: July 15, 2016, 02:05:25 pm »

[Buddie]

Assuming these posts aren’t a cut & paste patchwork of various research data obtained from the many resources that exist in cyberspace, I do admire you and appreciate the time and painstaking analysis involved in contributing to the BB.org information collective…

…unfortunately, I find the essence of many posts to be discouraging, disheartening, and offering little to no hope to those severely debilitated and crippled from the hellacious symptomatology of iatrogenic illness, as it exists in benzodiazepine withdrawal.

Words such as “permanent;” “irreversible;” and “learning deficit,” inspire hopelessness, fear, and a deep-seated sense of despair and anguish that isn’t easily resolved or relinquished; in fact, often thrusting the reader into a downward spiral, deeper into the abyss.

The scholarly, didactic verbiage that is necessary and inseparable from professional clinical trial and research writing format, further confuses and exacerbates the reader’s fragile psychological state.

For example:
“In rats given benzodiazepines chronically, the common α 1 γ2 sub-units are down-regulated, while rarer sub-units are elevated proportionately (Holt et al, 1999). It is suggested that transcription of the Gene cluster on Chromosome 5 (which encodes for α1 β2 γ2 sub-units) is inhibited on chronic benzodiazepine administration, while the transcription of the Gene cluster on Chromosome 15 is upregulated (Holt et al, 1999). In certain brain regions, the Chromosome-5-encoded receptor sub-unit proteins are replaced by those encoded in Chromosome 15, which show less sensitivity.” (4)

This excerpt is quite esoteric in nature and would require the highest level of comprehension and routine familiarity found mostly in researchers with PhD’s (not practitioners).

The one thing I’ve learned in neurology is that few things are conclusive or certain. BWS is severely under-researched and much is not fully understood by the medical community.

One question I continually ask myself since joining BB.org is, “How many people have I inadvertently hurt through bad advice?”

If for every 500 I helped, but hurt 1, I would cease to interact any further, simply because it’s not my call to make in weighing human wellness, health, and life.