Kooks chase their tails looking for benzo withdrawal cure, cryotherapy latest magic bullet

cryotherapy
« on: January 02, 2018, 03:04:32 pm »

[Buddie]

Did anyone do cryotherapy in an attempt to reset the body (hormones etc.) ?
And sleep better ?

I start a series of cryo sauna this week.

Re: cryotherapy
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2018, 05:10:27 pm »

[Buddie]

i would be cautious with cryotherapy – it is very extreme – the whole idea of it is to set off a massive endorphin release to heal and repair the body – which is normally a great thing – but in withdrawal – that could be a tough thing for the body to tolerate and could ultimately make things worse. when i was in withdrawal round 1 and didnt understand what was wrong – i took low dose naltrexone – as it’s a similar concept although no where near as extreme as cryotherapy – and i didnt sleep for 10 days. it set off a dramatic adrenal gland reaction that was awful.

i know a lot of people who’ve done cryotherapy to heal from lymes – it normally is a great healing modality but i’d approach it with caution.

not sure how your body responds to exercise. if you are one of the people who does really well with it – cryotherapy may have a positive outcome – if you do not tolerate exercise – like it sets off adrenaline and makes your symptoms worse – i can almost guarantee cryotherapy will have a paradoxical effect for you.

if you try it – certainly let us know how it went. I have a facility right near by that i plan to use once i feel my body could handle it.

Re: cryotherapy
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2018, 05:17:46 am »

[Buddie]

A word of caution…I have read of many different therapies having been used by folks on BB and have tried many myself. So far I have not heard of, or experienced, any that work. A whole lot of money and time was spent chasing these hopes. I have long since come to the conclusion that time is the only healer of what we are all going through.

Re: cryotherapy
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2018, 01:57:53 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on January 02, 2018, 03:04:32 pm
Did anyone do cryotherapy in an attempt to reset the body (hormones etc.) ?
And sleep better ?

I start a series of cryo sauna this week.

I Agree with Aloha and […]. I spent $7,000 going to the Coleman institute in September 2016 for his touted Flumazenil treatment. It did nothing except reset my recovery clock by X amount of time and flatten my wallet! Unfortunately the only way out is through the recovery process, which is all about time and more time. I will be 17 months off on Friday and I am still recovering in the sleep department. I had a decent night of sleep last night, but the night before was about 4 hours of broken sleep. There will be many ups and downs until your brain “fixes” things. In desperation we all look for that “magic” cure, treatment, supplement, therapy, etc. They don’t exist.

Re: cryotherapy
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2018, 04:37:58 pm »

[Buddie]

Tomorrow I will start the first of 3 treatments.
I focus my hope again, already did acupuncture, supplements, and I exercise and do normal sauna .

It is not that expensive, 20 euros per session.

Brainwashed kooks claim MTHFR gene mutation interfering with Ashton worship

Re: MTHFR gene mutation making W/D process worse?
« Reply #81 on: April 16, 2016, 11:38:18 am »

[Buddie]

Hey everyone great thread!

I also have a double mutation of the MTHFR gene C677T amongst other things that say I can not rebuild new neurons and regulate synapses properly 

I am 17 months out and have had the worst withdrawal imagineable, I still can’t even watch TV or go for a walk.

Can I just ask when all of you with this genetic mutation say that you […] to supplement is that because you’ve had additional blood/urine tests to show that the gene mutation is actually effecting you? My doctor says it would be crazy just to supplement on the basis of every gene mutation like this, he says if an an additional blood or urine test actually shows you are deficient in B12, B6, Folate etc. Then he would of course recommend supplementation but if you are not actually deficient then don’t?

He also was quick to say that Dr Lynch was not in fact a doctor and has nothing more than a standard college degree as his credentials, basically dismissed him as a quack.

Despite having the double mutation methyl B12 has been my cryptonite throughout my withdrawal, I’ve tried it on several occasions because I am a vegan too so […] to supplement B12, but when I try it revs me up for days like I’m on acid!

Needless to say I feel particularly stuck at the moment

Appreciate your thoughts

Kooks guzzle Kava Kava in hopes of staving off Ashton “cut and suffer” taper side effects

kava kava?
« on: February 20, 2016, 02:07:06 am »

[Buddie]

just got some Kava liquid has anybody used this? whats has it done for you? i just took the liquid a bit ago seems to help idk if it works or not please let me know

Re: kava kava?
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2016, 07:35:00 am »

[Buddie]

It relaxes me a bit but it can only be taken for a short period. I’ve also noticed that all the “calming” herbs etc. will turn on me after a few days, leaving me more anxious etc. I’m still trying to find a stack that works for me, because we are all different.

Re: kava kava?
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2016, 10:04:07 pm »

[Buddie]

why only short period? say its hard on liver possibly but so is drinking.

Homeopathy conference ends in chaos after delegates take hallucinogenic drug

An alternative medicine conference has ended in chaos in Germany after dozens of delegates took a LSD-like drug and started suffering from hallucinations.

Broadcaster NDR described the 29 men and women “staggering around, rolling in a meadow, talking gibberish and suffering severe cramps”.

The group of “Heilpraktikers” was discovered at the hotel where they held their conference in the town of Handeloh, south of Hamburg, on Friday. More than 150 medical staff, ambulances and police descended on the scene and took the raving delegates to hospital.

The patients, aged between 24 and 56, were found suffering from delusions, breathing problems, racing hearts and cramps, with some in a serious condition, Deutsche Welle reported.

Tests on their blood and urine revealed they had all taken hallucinogenic drug 2C-E, which is known as Aquarust in Germany and has been illegal there since the end of last year.

No one recovered sufficiently to be interviewed by police until Monday, a spokesperson said.

Torsten Passie, a member of the German government’s expert commission for narcotics, told NDR: “It must have been a multiple overdose. That does not support the view that the people concerned took the hallucinogen knowingly. One has to assume that people were not told about the substance, its effects and risks before taking it.”

Police are reportedly looking into possibilities including the drug being taken as a joint experiment, or it being furtively given to conference participants as a prank.

No arrests have yet been made as the investigation continues into a possible violation of Germany’s Narcotics Act.

The Association of German Healing Practitioners (VDH), which represents homeopaths as well as other naturopaths, quickly distanced itself from the embarrassment.

In a statement, it said none of its representatives took hallucinogens during the “incident” in Handeloh.

“The organisers of this obscure conference are unknown to us and such events will not be tolerated by our Association,” a spokesperson said.

“Unfortunately, the conference in Handeloh has severely damaged the image of the alternative medicine profession…and we have clarified that such acts are not in the spirit of natural therapy, and contradict our values both morally and legally. The Association of German Healing Practitioners (Heilpraktikers) detests such misdemeanors.”

The British Government’s drug advisory service, Frank, describes 2C-E as a psychedelic and hallucinogenic stimulant that has effects “somewhere between ecstasy and LSD”.

Anyone taking it experiences a buzz and feeling of being “alive and in tune with their surroundings”, their colours and smells.

It can also cause hallucinations, sexual arousal, hypersensitivity and other effects that become “more intense and uncontrollable” with higher doses.

The drug is classed as relatively new by Frank and not widely available in the UK, but is illegal as part of the phenethylamine family as a class A drug.

Sane people vandalize anti-vax kooks

ANTI-VACCINE BODY COUNT

The United States Anti-Vaccination Movement is composed of a variety of individuals ranging from former doctors who should know better, to semi-celebrities who have no medical training, to anti-government conspiracy theorists who distrust anything that the government says. They all hold onto the mistaken belief that autism is caused by receiving childhood vaccines.

Most anti-vaccination believers claim that the compound Thimerosal led to an increase in autism cases. The Measles/Mumps/Rubella vaccine is their usual target. However, Thimerosal was never used as a preservative in the Measles/Mumps/Rubella vaccine. No vaccine licensed since 1999 has contained Thimerosal as a preservative, except a few multi-dose container vaccines such as some (but not all) HIB and Influenza vaccines. Autism has not declined since 1999, thereby disproving this connection. However, this has not stopped anti-vaccination believers from claiming that it was the MMR vaccine itself that caused autism or that it was vaccines in general that caused autism. All of these ideas have been disproven in multiple scientific and legal examinations of the evidence. The primary scientific reason for the increase in autism diagnoses is due to more disorders being included in the Autism Spectrum and doctors getting better at diagnosing the characteristics of autism.

In 2007 there was an increase in celebrities promoting anti-vaccination rhetoric. Because of their celebrity status they appeared on several television shows and published multiple books advising parents not to vaccinate their children. This has led to an increase in the number of vaccine preventable illnesses as well as an increase in the number of vaccine preventable deaths.

The Anti-Vaccination Movement has a body count attached to its name. This website publishes the total number of vaccine preventable illnesses and vaccine preventable deaths that have happened in the United States since this 2007 increase in speaking out against vaccines.

Is the United States Anti-Vaccination Movement directly responsible for every vaccine preventable illness and every vaccine preventable death? No. However, the United States Anti-Vaccination Movement may be indirectly responsible for at least some of these illnesses and deaths and even one vaccine preventable illness or vaccine preventable death is too many.

WHAT IS THE RECOMMENDED VACCINE SCHEDULE?

When talking about vaccination it is important to understand what the recommended vaccine schedule is. This information is taken from this webpage from the Centers For Disease Control And Prevention. To see what diseases these vaccines are used to prevent please visit the What’s The Harm? webpage.

Recommended Immunization Schedule for Persons Aged 0 Through 18 Years – United States, 2015

Birth:
Hepatitis B (First of Three)

2 Months:
Diphtheria/Tetanus/Pertussis (First of Five)
Haemophilus Influenzae Type B (First of Three)
Hepatitis B (Second of Three)
Pneumococcal (First of Four)
Polio (First of Four)
Rotavirus (First of Two)
[Note: Some of the above vaccines are combined into one shot in order to reduce the number of injections.]

4 Months:
Diphtheria/Tetanus/Pertussis (Second of Five)
Haemophilus Influenzae Type B (Second of Three)
Pneumococcal (Second of Four)
Polio (Second of Four)
Rotavirus (Second of Two)
[Note: Some of the above vaccines are combined into one shot in order to reduce the number of injections.]

6 Months:
Diphtheria/Tetanus/Pertussis (Third of Five)
Hepatitis B (Third of Three)
Influenza (Yearly)
Pneumococcal (Third of Four)
Polio (Third of Four)
[Note: Some of the above vaccines are combined into one shot in order to reduce the number of injections.]

12 Months:
Haemophilus Influenzae Type B (Third of Three)
Hepatitis A (First of Two)
Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (First of Two)
Pneumococcal (Fourth of Four)
Varicella (First of Two)

15 Months:
Diphtheria/Tetanus/Pertussis (Fourth of Five)

18 Months:
Hepatitis A (Second of Two)
Influenza (Yearly)

3 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

4 Years:
Diphtheria/Tetanus/Pertussis (Fifth of Five)
Influenza (Yearly)
Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (Second of Two)
Polio (Fourth of Four)
Varicella (Second of Two)

5 to 10 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

11 Years:
Human Papillomavirus (First of Three)
Influenza (Yearly)
Meningococcal
Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis Booster

11 Years Two Months:
Human Papillomavirus (Second of Three)

11 Years Six Months:
Human Papillomavirus (Third of Three)

12 to 15 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

16 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)
Meningococcal Booster

17 to 18 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule – United States, 2015
19 to 20 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

21 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)
Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis Booster

22 to 30 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

31 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)
Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis Booster

32 to 40 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

41 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)
Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis Booster

42 to 50 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

51 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)
Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis Booster

52 to 59 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

60 Years:
Herpes Zoster
Influenza (Yearly)

61 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)
Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis Booster

62 to 64 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

65 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)
Pneumococcal

66 to 70 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

71 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)
Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis Booster

72 to 80 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

81 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)
Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis Booster

82 to 90 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

91 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)
Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis Booster

92 to 100 Years:
Influenza (Yearly)

Read more here: http://www.antivaccinebodycount.com/Anti-Vaccine_Body_Count/Home.html