Husband wants back on pills after Ashton taper leaves him unable to get off floor

At the risk of incurring the wrath of everyone here...
« on: October 09, 2017, 01:58:31 pm »

[Buddie]

my husband has been benzo free for 4 months and 1 week, and he is considering reinstating!!  :'(  It’s just too much. He feels like he will have an actual breakdown. He is being driven by the intrusive thoughts about his symptoms never getting better. He is lying on the floor all day, hardly able to walk to the bathroom, watching a few benign things on tv (but still on mute), but mostly panicked about his breathing symptoms. He still can’t feel himself breathing -loss of sensation in nostrils/numb nose/feels like nose is blocked/feels like nose is collapsing- and his nose is getting drier still and black chunks are coming off the walls. Really bad air hunger from (seemingly) the incredibly tight muscles in his chest. Throat constriction. This is hell folks.

I know the mantra on this site is to soldier through, but seriously, I had to invoke the Baker Act 5 years ago, and he was put on these benzos after that. He might not make it through this.

I’m sure I’m going to get a slew of “you can’t do it” posts, and “don’t reinstate” posts, but seriously, if you have experience with late reinstatement, or reinstatement that relieved your physical symptoms, I want to hear them. Even if you tell me it relieved it at the time, but you wish you hadn’t because it kindled the next withdrawal, at least tell me that you got some relief initially.

Alternately, if you had similar nose issues, when did they get better for you?

Angry addict’s rage puts two-year old at risk

Extreme Rage/Anger
« on: September 11, 2017, 10:23:00 am »

[Buddie]

I have this constant rage or anger where I just want to start screaming or punching walls. It lasts almost all day. I have zero patience with anything/anyone. Can anyone relate/validate this for me? When did it subside for you? I have a 2 year old daughter and I get so frustrated way to easily.

I need reassurance 

Re: Extreme Rage/Anger
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2017, 10:30:00 am »

[Buddie]

deep massage in the liver

it went away with time for me

Re: Extreme Rage/Anger
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2017, 03:05:03 pm »

[Buddie]

I’ve been having this on and off during my taper. It is very hard to not actually get very angry at something for me. I think the longest it lasted was two weeks but it seems to keep coming and going for me.

Shocking real life “taper apartment”

The above apartment was used for a years-long, failed Valium taper. After a grueling 1600 day micro-taper, directed by online kooks, the addict relapsed on diazepam. He since has been checked (5150’d) into a mental hospital where he is getting needed professional medical help. Shame on the people who let this poor unfortunate suffer in such squalor.

Microtapering madness: Ashton dogma costs addict job

Lost my job due to withdrawal. It's time to go back on. What now?
« on: April 18, 2017, 12:03:09 pm »

[Buddie]

Hello everyone,

My arduous journey with benzodiazepine drugs didn’t begin until August of 2015. I started taking 10mg of valium per day. Fast forward to a year later, and my initial efforts at trying to cease usage commenced. Work got tough, and I had to jump back on. The new year started (2017), and I once again made the attempt.

Long story short, valium withdrawal makes it impossible for me to function at work. I cannot concentrate, I make mistakes, and it makes me an unpleasant person. This resulted in me being pushed out of my job. I am very fortunate that I got another one, but I am very fearful of ever attempting to come off again. I’m going to be making an appointment with a psychiatrist once again and just be straight with them – I need this drug to function and hold down a job.

For me, honestly, outside of my job – I feel the withdrawal process was actually ok. I haven’t had huge problems sleeping, although I reliably wakeup after about 5 hours of sleep. Socially, I feel like I’m doing ok. It’s really only at work where my anxiety level about whether or not I would be fired was over the top.

Almost everything else I can live with, but the lack of concentration, drive, and focus is very bad. Even with a gradual taper, it was debilitating. My job requires both drive and extreme concentration and attention to detail. I lose all of that during withdrawal.

My plan is to see a new psychiatrist, and explain that I need to get stable for a few months with whatever drugs are necessary, and then commence either a very long taper or an inpatient treatment center (if I can afford it).

One thing that concerns me is my aggression that is heightened during withdrawal. I really feel like it might be worth asking a psychiatrist for prozac or something similar in addition to the valium. Maybe even lithium.

I know a lot of people here have just as difficult of a time as me, but please keep in mind, I cannot easily just take 3-4 months off.

Today, it almost seems like I should just accepting being an addict until such time as I can attempt another taper or detox clinic.

Does it seem wise to jump on again so I can have a career? Should I be considering other adjunctive drugs, such as an antidepressant?

Proactive advice welcome. Thank you!

Benzo class action lawsuit dreamers keep banging their heads against the wall

Class Action Lawsuit-Please read
« on: July 15, 2016, 02:45:21 pm »

[Buddie]

Hello everyone,
I am a member of a FB Benzodiazapine Legal board. Evidentally there is a Law firm called Sokolaw Law Firm that is taking intakes from people that have been harmed from Benzodiazapines. I just called and did an intake giving them a description of my physical, mental,and financial suffering/losses that I have sustained. Their phone number is 1-800-568-4832 or 1-866-444-9876. They are also working with Co-Councils in Canada and other counties.You may call them if you live outside of the U.S. Please call and tell them your story.Tell them that you are a new caller and are requesting an intake questionnaire. We need to stand in solidarity.
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Common anti-psychiatry archetypes

The anti-psychiatry movement resembles the anti-vaccine movement and HIV/AIDS denialism in many ways. Whereas anti-vaccine cranks claim that vaccine-preventable diseases are not that bad and HIV/AIDS denialists often deny the causal link between HIV and AIDS, anti-psychiatry cranks typically deny the existence of mental conditions outright (claiming they are made up or that they are “natural” states) or blame the individuals for “attracting” the illness into their lives with “too much negative thinking”. All three groups attack the underlying scientific models (e. g. mechanisms for vaccine-induced immunity and herd immunity, that HIV cause a reduction in CD4+ T helper cells, the biological basis and neurological mechanisms of mental conditions), the efficacy of the medical product, pharmaceutical companies, the government and the scientific community.

This post is an attempt to summarize seven of the most common clusters of characteristics, beliefs and approaches taken by various types of anti-psychiatry cranks: the creationist, the alt med zealot, the new age ignoramus, the “sophisticated” mysterian, the selective “skeptic”, the conspiracy lunatic and the scientologist. These archetypes are not based on published scientific studies, but rather on experience with debating anti-psychiatry cranks. Some of them overlap and not all features of a given archetype always occur. An interesting observation is that anti-psychiatry can be found across political, religious and philosophical spectra and divides. Even though a lot of the assertions made and rhetoric deployed is consistent across archetypes, different archetypes have different motivations and a slightly different focus.

The Creationist: the anti-psychiatry creationist represents the worst of two worlds: both a rejection of modern cosmology, geology and biology as well as a rejection of modern neuroscience, psychology and psychiatry. These individuals reject psychiatry and related fields because (1) neuroscience considers the mind to be a function of the brain, which is incompatible with the anti-psychiatry creationist’s faith that an immaterial soul is the entity responsible for the mind and (2) treatments of mental conditions does not involve a consideration of original sin, but focuses on medication and therapy. Although not all creationists are anti-psychiatry, those that are reject additional fields of science in order to keep their religious beliefs afloat. Depending on the individual anti-psychiatry creationist, he or she may reject the existence of mental conditions as medical conditions or go so far as to provide a religious description of mental conditions as demonic possessions or gifts from a deity.

The Alt Med Zealot: the alt med zealot embraces anti-psychiatry because he or she wrongly believes in the efficacy and safety of so-called “alternative” treatments for mental conditions. In reality, these alleged “treatments” are quackery and almost never gives any practically significant benefit above placebo. Most of the time, these individuals accepts the medical reality of mental conditions. However, they tend to shuns positions supported mainstream science, usually by ignorantly dismissing it all by shouting about “evil, multinational pharmaceutical corporations” (apparently without realizing the irony that a lot of “alternative medicine” is being produced and sold by large corporations) and accusing all critics of their beliefs of being pharma shills.

The New Age Ignoramus: although sharing many defining features with the alt med zealot, the new age ignoramus often parrot the law of attraction and wrongly claim that individuals with mental conditions have themselves to blame because they allegedly had too many negative thoughts. Seemingly ignorant about the scientific research on genetic risk factors for mental conditions, the effects of stressful life events and gene-environment interaction, the new age ignoramus rarely accept the medical reality of mental conditions. Instead, they often reject both medication and therapy, suggesting that individuals with mental conditions will attract good things in their life if they just have more positive thoughts.

The “Sophisticated” Mysterian: mysterians are typically non-religious atheists who has a negative visceral and emotional response to the notion that their beliefs, thoughts, feelings and so on are related to the function of a physical brain. The three most common approaches taken by this anti-psychiatry archetype is (1) Appeals to ignorance characterized by “we will never understand human cognitive feature X” were X is love, art appreciation, beauty, consciousness and so on, (2) point out some methodological limitation regarding questions of how the brain generates the mind in an bait-and-switch effort to attempt to undermine the scientific conclusion that the brain does generate the mind and (3) unrelenting accusations of “scientism”, “reductionism” and “determinism”. Mysterians are not seldom freelance journalists blogging for Nature News, Scientific Americans, Washington Post or the New York Times.

The Selective “Skeptic”: these are self-described “skeptics” who mock anti-vaccine cranks and HIV/AIDS denialists for their flawed assertions and dishonest debating tactics (like misunderstanding basic science, quoting scientists out of context, creating a manufactroversy, false balance, playing the martyr card, misusing statistics and so on), yet has no problem using these exact pseudoscientific tactics when attacking psychiatry. Pointing this out is not sufficient to break the bubble of cognitive dissonance and will usually be met with rationalizations and denial. Published scientific evidence in favor of psychiatric models and treatments are met with extreme skepticism, whereas random blog posts online that attacks psychiatry is often accepted with little skepticism.

The Conspiracy Lunatic: this anti-psychiatry archetype is essentially a misguided freedom fighter stuck in Soviet Union of the 1960s. The conspiracy lunatic thinks that all mental conditions are supposedly without any foundation in reality and allegedly invented by evil psychiatrists in collusion with the government and/or pharmaceutical companies. All treatments are believed to be a form of human enslavement. Medication is allegedly used either to brainwash people or keep them pacified while the government, banks or alien reptiles take over the world. Involuntary psychiatric treatment is seen as kidnapping and imprisonment of dissenters instead of a way to protect a person who is at high risk of serious harm or death. ECT, a last-resort treatment given to individuals with severe and treatment resistant depression when all else fail and the life of the person hangs in the balance, is wrongly seen as cruel punishment (despite the fact that individuals undergoing that treatment are given general anesthesia and a muscle-relaxant and that brain scans show that brain damage does not occur).

The Scientologist: this anti-psychiatry archetype is associated with scientology, but it shares many core features in common with the other six archetypes. This is presumably because of the early and close historical links between the two movements. Some scientologists consider themselves at war with psychiatry: they believe that mental illness is a fraud and thinks that psychiatrists are crime-causing terrorists who kidnap, torture and murder innocent people.

Although not empirically validated by any means, these archetypes are useful representations of some of the common themes and clusters of ideologies that defenders of mainstream psychiatry come across when refuting mental illness deniers and anti-psychiatry proponents.

References:

Overview of Anti-Psychiatry

Lieberman, J. A. (2013). DSM-5: Caught between Mental Illness Stigma and Anti-Psychiatry Prejudice. Scientific American Mind Guest Blog. Accessed: 2013-08-07.

The Debunking Anti-Psychiatry Category on Debunking Denialism.

Steven Novella’s excellent series on mental illness denial.

Mieszkowski, K. (2005). Scientology’s war on psychiatry. Salon. Accessed: 2013-08-07.

Safety and Efficacy of ECT

Abrams, Richard. (2000). … and there’s no proof of lasting brain damage. Nature, 403(6772), 826-826.

Devanand D.P., Dwork A.J., Hutchinson E.R., Bolwig T.G., Sackeim H.A. (1994). Does ECT alter brain structure? Am J Psychiatry. 151(7):957-70.

Fink, Max. (2000). ECT has proved effective in treating depression … Nature, 403(6772), 826-826.

Giltay, E. J., Khol, K. H., Blansjaar, B. A. (2008). Serum markers of brain-cell damage and C-reactive protein are unaffected by electroconvulsive therapy. The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, 9(3), 231-235.

Lilienfeld, Scott O., Lynn, Steven Jay, Ruscio, John, & Beyerstein, Barry L. (2011). 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Behavior. West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.

Mayo Clinic. (2012). Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Accessed: 2013-08-07.

Palmio, Johanna, Huuhka, Martti, Laine, Seppo, Huhtala, Heini, Peltola, Jukka, Leinonen, Esa, . . . Keränen, Tapani. (2010). Electroconvulsive therapy and biomarkers of neuronal injury and plasticity: Serum levels of neuron-specific enolase and S-100b protein. Psychiatry Research, 177(1–2), 97-100.

Reisner AD. (2003). The electroconvulsive therapy controversy: evidence and ethics. Neuropsychol Rev. 13(4):199-219.

Zachrisson, Olof C. G., Balldin, Jan, Ekman, Rolf, Naesh, Ole, Rosengren, Lars, Ågren, Hans, & Blennow, Kaj. (2000). No evident neuronal damage after electroconvulsive therapy. Psychiatry Research, 96(2), 157-165.

Original here: http://debunkingdenialism.com/2013/08/07/some-common-anti-psychiatry-archetypes/