Heartless family sends woman flying into arms of another family, a cult family

Pisses me off that this is not seen as a legimate illness (rant)
« on: December 14, 2017, 01:54:09 pm »

[Buddie]

My mom and other family members love to laugh about panic disorder and anxiety. Why? Because they don’t understand it. My distant cousin who’s gone through some trauma of her own is on 4 different medications for anxiety and depression. The way they just talked about her and another family member who has social anxiety really angered me. They dismiss everything about this illness and just made fun of how she shakes constantly and how the other one can’t look up to say hi to a stranger. I heard them in the back laughing how everyone has a panic disorder. The ignorance just blows my mind.

I don’t find this funny at all. I’m shaking cause I’m so upset right now. What would they do if they experienced 5 minutes of panic? 5 minutes of the mental torment. I bet they’d swallow every pill in sight as well in the hopes of feeling normal again. I know I’m healing and what I’m going through is w/d but there are people out there with legitimate illnesses. For some people this isn’t w/d and is a part of their everyday lives..

Do we need to get cancer for someone to actually care? Do people with mental illnesses need to be hooked up to 4 ivs in a hospital bed for someone to understand? This is not cool. There needs to be more awareness, more compassion in our society. This just sickens me.

I might’ve lost my temper at them and am complelety ok with that. Someone needed to.

Scientology and Benzo Buddies both lie about their membership numbers

  • In 2001, the American Religious Identification Survey (ARIS) reported that there were 55,000 adults in the United States who consider themselves Scientologists.[158] A 2008 survey of American religious affiliations by the US Census Bureau estimated there to be 25,000 Americans identifying as Scientologists.[159][160]
  • The 2001 United Kingdom census contained a voluntary question on religion, to which approximately 48,000,000 chose to respond. Of those living in England and Wales who responded, a total of 1,781 said they were Scientologists.[161]
  • In 2001, Statistics Canada, the national census agency, reported a total of 1,525 Scientologists nationwide,[161] up from 1,220 in 1991.[162] In 2011 census the number of scientologist raised to 1,745.[163]
  • In 2005, the German Office for the Protection of the Constitution estimated a total of 5,000 – 6,000 Scientologists in that country, and mentioned a count of 12,000 according to Scientology Germany.[164]
  • In the 2006 New Zealand census, 357 people identified themselves as Scientologists, although a Church spokesperson estimated there were between 5,000 and 6,000 Scientologists in the country.[165] Earlier census figures were 207 in the 1991 census, 219 in 1996, and 282 in 2001.[161]
  • In 2006, Australia’s national census recorded 2,507 Scientologists nationwide, up from 1,488 in 1996, and 2,032 in 2001.[161][166] The 2011 census however found a decrease of 13.7 per cent from the 2006 census.[167]
  • In 2011 support for Scientology in Switzerland was said to have experience a steady decline from 3,000 registered members in 1990 to 1,000 members and the organization was said to be facing extinction in the country. A Church of Scientology spokeswoman rejected the figures insisting that the organization had 5,000 “passive and active members in Switzerland”.[168]
  • Benzo Buddies currently lists 39,257 members. In actuality, less than 1% of that figure are active members. A simple way to prove this is by checking who has posted, easy for any member to do (most members have posted once, or twice). Another way to prove this is by looking at any of the cult’s so-called benzo petitions – you will find most of them can barely manage 200 people (worldwide).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_Scientology#Membership_statistics

Anti-psychiatry Benzo Buddies ghouls try to talk hallucinating addict out of seeking professional help

Considering Nursing Home care
« on: November 01, 2017, 11:34:47 pm »

[Buddie]

Hello everyone,

I have been through multiple withdrawals, almost on a monthly basis, over the past 5 years of being on klonopin. I made a huge mistake doing that, and I now know it. I was so frightened and terrified that I couldn’t even think straight. Even on the medication, I was in a lot of distress. I am now hardly able to take care of myself. I have lost almost all proprioception and can’t feel the muscles I’m tensing. This actually started possibly years ago. I am at a point where I have encountered near death experiences of being completely out of my body, much more than just dr/dp. I haven’t been able to let my body relax since my high anxiety took me into dr/dp 7 years ago (upon which I became frozen in my own body and couldn’t get help or info anywhere), 2 years before I was on meds. I am afraid to move or even think about most of my body and head. My sense of my body is constantly fluctuating. I have saucer sized pupils almost all day every day. When I look at them under light in the bathroom, they are constantly becoming huge then small. My mother has been taking care of me for the past 3 years, but she is getting older and I can’t put this on her anymore. I am only 31, but I am becoming severely disabled by this. If I even think about my body I feel pain. Over the years of repeated withdrawal, I have been mentally running away from what is happening to me more and more. The more I go on, the worse everything is getting. I am now having near-death compelete out of body experiences frequently. My nervous system is so wired that when I get up to do something, I am completely out of my body and can’t feel anything. When I sit down I start to feel all kinds of pain and horrible sensations. My proprioception is totally gone. My mouth feels sideways sometimes. Other times it starts to feel gigantic. And it is all I can really notice. Something is very wrong with me. I’ve done some kind of damage that I couldn’t feel because I’ve been outside of my body for years. I do have a feeling that I’m going to die, but it’s not a panicky one that I had 7 years ago when I entered dr/dp. This is an oddly calm acceptance.

So, I really think I need to be in a nursing home under medical care despite my age. I just contacted my doctor about it and I’m waiting for a reply. I know this seems crazy to everyone else in my life, but I know it’s what needs to be done in case something happens and to relieve the burden on my mother. I’m only getting worse and worse, and I have a feeling I’m on the verge of a serious occurrence that may threaten my life. I may even have to go back on klonopin just to stabilize. Just maybe there is a possibility I could do a supremely slow taper at some point in the distant future after I possibly correct the things that are physically wrong with me. To be honest, a lot of what I read here is what I experienced during my first or second year on the med. I feel like I unknowingly kindled myself dozens of times and found out all of this information I found way too late.

So, I guess my question is, what do you guys think? I’m losing my abilities to do anything even worse than before. I was hardly able to take care of myself the last few years on klonopin. I just sat in my chair hoping to distract myself at my computer. I had to leave grad school a year before I had my phd, and I pretty much became homebound then. I thought it was all just some mysterious thing that was destroying me and no one could figure it out. Now I know, but it’s too late. Do you think I will be able to do this? Do they have to have a definite diagnosis for me to be put in there? Please let me know anything you have to say about this.

Re: Considering Nursing Home care
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2017, 12:05:41 am »

[Buddie]

If you tell your doctor what you just wrote they won’t put you in a nursing home unfortunately, they’ll send you to a psych hospital. I know your feeling rough and guilty but you got to pull yourself together for your family. Vent all you want, it helps for sure but just know that you aren’t broken forever. This will end one day. You might have underlying issues as so I as well but this isn’t baseline if you weeent like this prior to the meds.

Benzo Buddies promotes Scientology cult’s Tom Cruise’s “wisdom”

The Wisdom of Tom Cruise
« on: November 05, 2017, 05:17:16 pm »

[Buddie]

Often think of the 2005 interview with Matt Lauer and Tom Cruise and how right Cruise was.

My draw-ring for today:

http://anxiousinklings.com
« Last Edit: November 05, 2017, 05:25:19 pm by [Buddie] »

Re: The Wisdom of Tom Cruise
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2017, 06:05:01 pm »

[Buddie]

It’s haunting now to look back and know that he was right…about these poisons. Great artwork!

Benzo Buddies uses Las Vegas tragedy to promote Scientology

Re: Unfortunately the Las Vegas tragedy will create new benzo buddies
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2017, 02:29:19 pm »

[Buddie]

I wouldn’t be surprised if it turns out the killer was on psych drugs. Probably not benzos, but SSRI’s. Most of them are. http://www.cchrflorida.org/antidepressants-are-a-prescription-for-mass-shootings/

Perhaps if you did not threaten them, harass them and bash them more doctors would come to Benzo Buddies but I doubt it

It's a shame we don't have medical professionals checking in here
« on: March 05, 2017, 02:50:39 am »

[Buddie]

It’s very odd that there are apparently so few doctors that check in here.

I used to be a chronic pain patient (I’m one of the few that got better btw). That’s how I ended up on lunesta. I used to frequent chronic pain forums. There were usually several pain doctors that frequented those forums and they were quite helpful.

There seems to be a total absence of doctors here.

We did have Perseverance, who was apparently some sort of medical professional (I’m not sure of the details). She came here because of her own ordeal with benzos, but she was so helpful to so many here as evidenced by all the pinned topics she was responsible for at the top of this forum. Thankfully she seems to have healed and moved on, but she’s left a hole that no one else has filled.

It almost feels like the medical profession has deserted us, which is a bit cruel given that they were in most cases the ones that gave us these drugs in the first place.