After 39 months of post-taper hell 68-year-old wants back on Xanax so he can live again

Better Off, Really?
« on: November 07, 2017, 05:58:24 pm »

[Buddie]

Well, I am 68. Off 13 years of benzos for 39 months now. To say this has been hell is being kind. I can’t think of a strong enough word. So, in the past years I seldom sleep. This has led to severe depression, extreme sadness, no life,no hope. I have aged externally and internally exponentially. Given my age I am believing now I would have been better off staying on. I know many heal, and I also know some do not. I am just venting here. I realize most comments will be stay strong and don’t give in and you will heal. I felt that way for many months and years. No more.

So, I am giving this through February. If after that I am not better, I am going back on and buying myself whatever good weeks or months I can grab. I can’t take years more of this. I see some have been 5 or more years struggling. Maybe if I were younger. I didn’t work 30 years and save money to now stay home and cry and hope. Which is worse really, no life or a short time of living again. Hmmmmm….

Xanax-fentanyl combo kills

Fake Xanax cut with potent pain med can be a killer

1 person died, 8 were sickened when illicit pills circulated in San Francisco, doctors report

TUESDAY, Aug. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) — At least one San Francisco-area drug user died and eight more landed in the ER in late 2015 after taking counterfeit Xanax tablets that had been cut with a powerful and dangerous opiate, a new report shows.

The nine people all had taken tablets that looked very similar to prescription Xanax, down to bearing the same pharmaceutical markings as the legitimate anxiety drug, said report author Dr. Ann Arens. She is a former ER physician at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital.

But the tablets had been cut with fentanyl, a cheap, synthetic opioid that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says is 100 times more potent than morphine. The rock star Prince died of a fentanyl overdose at his Paisley Park recording studio in Minneapolis in April.

“They look exactly the same, and the users that were exposed to these tablets had no idea it was anything other than what they thought they were buying,” said Arens, who recently took a new job as attending ER physician at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis.

Three people who took the fake pills suffered from heart attacks and one from heart failure, while others experienced a dangerous dip in their respiratory and nervous system function, according to the case report.

The patients included an infant who had to be placed on a respirator after taking a fake Xanax pill he found lying on the ground at home.

The case report was published online Aug. 8 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

Manufacture of counterfeit medications has increased with the epidemic of prescription drug abuse, said Marcia Lee Taylor, president and CEO of the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids.

Drug abusers turn to street dealers to buy prescription drugs when they can’t purchase the medications through a pharmacy, Taylor said. These dealers have no scruples about selling fake tablets that may contain other substances, she said.

Fentanyl is a common ingredient in these counterfeit drugs because it’s cheap and potent, Taylor said.

“Oftentimes illicit drugs are cut with cheaper substances to stretch the product. Fentanyl is just another sort of product on the shelf to cut drugs with,” Taylor said. “Unfortunately, unlike baking soda or other materials used to stretch the active ingredient in a drug, this has very dangerous side effects. It doesn’t take much fentanyl to lead to an overdose.”

Drug abusers turn to street dealers to buy prescription drugs when they can’t purchase the medications through a pharmacy, Taylor said. These dealers have no scruples about selling fake tablets that may contain other substances, she said.

Fentanyl is a common ingredient in these counterfeit drugs because it’s cheap and potent, Taylor said.

“Oftentimes illicit drugs are cut with cheaper substances to stretch the product. Fentanyl is just another sort of product on the shelf to cut drugs with,” Taylor said. “Unfortunately, unlike baking soda or other materials used to stretch the active ingredient in a drug, this has very dangerous side effects. It doesn’t take much fentanyl to lead to an overdose.”

Xanax is a mild sedative normally used to treat anxiety and panic disorders.

The fake Xanax containing fentanyl came to the attention of San Francisco doctors in mid-October 2015, when a man in his 20s and a woman in her 30s were taken to the ER at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital after consuming the pills.

A third person with them, a woman in her 30s, was found dead in their home, Arens said.

The blood of all three tested positive for fentanyl, even though the survivors said they had only used alcohol, cocaine and Xanax, Arens said.

The doctors suspected the Xanax was counterfeit and laced with fentanyl, and their suspicions were confirmed when a fourth patient wound up in the ER. The patient, a man in his early 20s, still had some of the counterfeit Xanax on his person, and testing revealed that the tablets had been cut with fentanyl, Arens explained.

Five more hospitalizations involving fake Xanax cropped up after that, including the infant, two boys in their late teens, a man in his mid-20s and a man in his mid-40s, the report said.

These were difficult cases to treat, because the patients were suffering from symptoms that didn’t line up with what they said they had taken, Arens said.

“People may be presenting differently than what they think they took, and it makes it difficult to diagnose,” Arens said. “It’s hard to predict what someone could have gotten into when they buy things off the street.”

Other deaths occurred as a result of the fake Xanax, Arens said, and will be detailed in an upcoming paper from the San Francisco medical examiner’s office.

These cases should serve as a warning to people tempted to buy prescription medications from illicit sources, be it a street dealer or a shady online retailer, Taylor said.

“If you buy it outside of the medical system and on the street, you’re putting yourself at risk for a counterfeit product,” Taylor said. “You don’t know what’s going to be in it, and how you’re going to react to it.”

http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/news/20160809/fake-xanax-cut-with-potent-pain-med-can-be-a-killer

Hated Tory ghoul David Cameron praises cult leader Ashton

HOUSE OF COMMONS

APPGITA – All Party Parliamentary Group for Involuntary Tranquilliser Addiction
House of Commons, London SW1A 0AA
Question by Jim Dobbin MP
Prime Minister’s Questions
House of Commons
October 23, 2013

Jim Dobbin MP (Heywood and Middleton): A total of 1.5 million people in the UK are addicted to the benzodiazepines diazepam and “Z drugs”. I know of one individual who has been on those products for more than 45 years – a total life ruined. They are not drug misusers; they are victims of the system of repeat prescriptions. Will the Prime Minister advise the Department of Health to give some guidance to the clinical commissioning groups to introduce withdrawal programmes in line with the advice from Professor Heather Ashton of Newcastle university, who is the expert in this field, to give these people back their lives?

The Prime Minister, Rt. Hon David Cameron MP: First, I pay tribute to the hon. Gentleman, who has campaigned strongly on this issue over many years. I join him in paying tribute to Professor Ashton, whom I know has considerable expertise in this area. He is right to say that this is a terrible affliction; these people are not drug addicts but they have become hooked on repeat prescriptions of tranquillisers. The Minister for public health is very happy to discuss this issue with him and, as he says, make sure that the relevant guidance can be issued.

David Cameron’s savage NHS budget cuts have forced the mentally ill  to fend for themselves in the Dickensian nightmare of 21st century England.

Impact of mental health service cuts

The Guardian, Thursday 17 October 2013

The wider implications should be heeded of the sentencing of a homeless man with paranoid schizophrenia for the stabbing to death of two Big Issue sellers (Report, 16 October). As John Bird, founder of the Big Issue, observes, the tragedy is an opportunity to reflect on the impact of cuts to mental health services. I visit mental health facilities on a weekly basis to review the detention of compulsorily detained patients. It has been increasingly apparent for months that patients are being admitted to hospitals hundreds of miles from where they live because of the lack of beds in their own locality.

This impression is now given an evidential basis by the BBC and Community Care investigations which used freedom of information requests to identify that at least 1,711 psychiatric beds have closed since April 2011, most of them in acute adult wards, older people’s wards and psychiatric intensive care units. Not only is admission to facilities far from home detrimental to the wellbeing of patients because of the disruption to their support networks, the increased complexity of setting up and monitoring their care after discharge from hospital in rare cases compromises public safety.

It is an inadequate response by the Department of Health to cite increased numbers of service users being seen in their own homes. Improvements in community care are obviously welcome, but do not obviate the need to provide appropriate hospital care for those who are acutely ill. Depositing people far from their homes is reminiscent of Hieronymus Bosch’s painting The Ship of Fools and invokes medieval attitudes towards people who are mentally unwell.

Professor emeritus Nick Gould
Department of social and policy sciences, University of Bath

Heather Ashton acknowledged by David Cameron, Prime Minister
« on: October 24, 2013, 04:20:35 am »

[Buddie]

H O U S E O F C O M M O N S
APPGITA – All Party Parliamentary Group for
Involuntary Tranquilliser Addiction
House of Commons, London SW1A 0AA
Question by Jim Dobbin MP,
Prime Minister’s Questions,
House of Commons,
October 23, 2013

Jim Dobbin MP (Heywood and Middleton): A total of 1.5 million people in the UK are addicted to the benzodiazepines diazepam and “Z drugs”. I know of one individual who has been on those products for more than 45 years – a total life ruined. They are not drug misusers; they are victims of the system of repeat prescriptions. Will the Prime Minister advise the Department of Health to give some guidance to the clinical commissioning groups to introduce withdrawal programmes in line with the advice from Professor Heather Ashton of Newcastle university, who is the expert in this field, to give these people back their lives?

The Prime Minister, Rt. Hon David Cameron MP: First, I pay tribute to the hon. Gentleman, who has campaigned strongly on this issue over many years. I join him in paying tribute to Professor Ashton, whom I know has considerable expertise in this area. He is right to say that this is a terrible affliction; these people are not drug addicts but they have become hooked on repeat prescriptions of tranquillisers. The Minister for public health is very happy to discuss this issue with him and, as he says, make sure that the relevant guidance can be issued.

For more articles, newsletters and information please see the main APPGITA page.

APPGITA

Re: Heather Ashton acknowledged by David Cameron, Prime Minister
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2013, 08:20:31 am »

[Buddie]

wow […], i am so excited.
this is a big step forward […], there will be an ”out-cry” all over the world soon i think.
thanks for posting. please keep us up to date. i appreciate it.
[…]

Re: Heather Ashton acknowledged by David Cameron, Prime Minister
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2013, 01:41:49 pm »

[Buddie]

Thanks, […], for posting this.
This is great news and we should post this everywhere. I’m going to show this to my doctor,
who, by the way, understands.

Thanks so much,
and all my best,
[…]

Re: Heather Ashton acknowledged by David Cameron, Prime Minister
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2013, 07:11:45 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on October 24, 2013, 04:20:35 am
I join him in paying tribute to Professor Ashton, whom I know has considerable expertise in this area. He is right to say that this is a terrible affliction; these people are not drug addicts but they have become hooked on repeat prescriptions of tranquillisers. The Minister for public health is very happy to discuss this issue with him and, as he says, make sure that the relevant guidance can be issued.

Very encouraging! Thank you for posting this. I guess the minister referred to is Jane Ellison.

Re: Heather Ashton acknowledged by David Cameron, Prime Minister
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2013, 05:42:20 am »

[Buddie]

If anybody wants to read more about this kind of UK stuff, go to benzo.org.uk and check the APPGITA link

Re: Heather Ashton acknowledged by David Cameron, Prime Minister
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2013, 06:14:31 am »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on October 25, 2013, 05:42:20 am
If anybody wants to read more about this kind of UK stuff, go to benzo.org.uk and check the APPGITA link

Thanks i am reading it. The Sunday Times article from August is quite scary.
imagine, 200 women a day are admitted daily to hospital and its quite remarkable, that
they call it ”Drug Poisoning”, cause thats what it is in the end.
”Poison on Prescription”. shocking.

Re: Heather Ashton acknowledged by David Cameron, Prime Minister
« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2013, 10:16:09 pm »

[Buddie]

Thank you for posting this […]. I’d been loosely following what’s happening in the UK via the excellent benzo.uk.org site by Ray Nimmo. […], an “out-cry” around the world is exactly what I’ve been hoping for these last two years. Let’s keep our fingers crossed. This seems like a good step forward, an acknowledgement by the PM.

S.