Benzo Buddies cult members wallow in filth ridden benzo-homes in pursuit of eternal taper

My home is one big mess
« on: February 28, 2018, 10:30:33 am »

[Buddie]

I’m really ashamed, but that’s the truth. I don`t usually like this, but I can`t clean. I live alone.

Is it just me who has this, how are you? Do you have any tips?

Re: My home is one big mess
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2018, 11:31:01 am »

[Buddie]

Hey […]-

I too had this the first 6 months or so when I was in acute phase. I am normally a very tidy person. I have always like things organized & put in place. I was in such bad condition that I was not physically able to do ANYTHING. I literally sat in my chair with laptop or lay in bed for 6 months. It actually may have been longer (I would have to go read my journal but I still am not able to go back & look though that journal PTSD issues :( ) Anyhow,  I do remember at the time telling myself “it is ok, you can deal with this later”.  So I lived in squalor for all that time because I truly had NO one to help me. So just tell yourself that “it is ok & that you will deal with it later when you are better able to cope”. That is all you need to do… :thumbsup:  :smitten:

Re: My home is one big mess
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2018, 11:49:01 am »

[Buddie]

My house is also much more messy than before because I have less energy and I need to save it for the essential. It’s a benzo-home 

Re: My home is one big mess
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2018, 11:57:21 am »

[Buddie]

Same as you guys, it was on of the first things to go south. I think it began due to the mental anxiety of the unknown road ahead, I would find myself needing to be distracted positively and not doing things like house work. Then I could not lift a finger without my heart racing and suffering symptoms as I cleaned.

Ironically, I feel soooo much better if the place is clean though 

Re: My home is one big mess
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2018, 01:14:00 pm »

[Buddie]

I was keeping up until the valium sedated me so badly. Now, unfortunately it has gotten away from me. My husband does quite a bit but he works all week as well. oh well, it will be here when I feel better again. We’ll tackle it then. I am predicting a lot of stuff that has needed to be thrown away will get thrown away then 

Re: My home is one big mess
 « Reply #5 on: February 28, 2018, 02:01:32 pm »

[Buddie]

The worst part is when my friends come with my food, they have to wait in the doorway, I don`t want to let anyone in. It feels so bad! But maybe I can clean tomorrow? No….

Re: My home is one big mess
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2018, 02:08:55 pm »

[Buddie]

I have been messy for a while now, and I really think benzo brain is to blame. I mean, even back when I was still taking them, as prescribed, I had a hard time managing and keeping things clean. I stopped caring what others think about my mess a while ago. I’ll let people in. You would be surprised how many people have times where their places or someone they know is so messy. My old landlady used to come once a month and clean my house with me. That was always so much easier to have someone else to clean with.

I had a cleaning person for a little while, but I think I was too friendly with her, because I felt like she was taking advantage of me. She would mop all the floors and then dump the buckets in the bathttub and leave a giant muddy mess in my bathtub and all my floors would be sopping wet. Then when I asked her to dry the floors she would come up with weird excuses. In fact, she had a ton of excuses. One time I asked her to clean the oven and she told me a whole sob story about how she was chemically burned from oven cleaner. It was so annoying cause she could have cleaned the oven with just regular soap and water, instead of just taking up all that time to tell me the story.

Oh I am very talkative today.

Re: My home is one big mess
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2018, 04:22:46 pm »

[Buddie]

Whenever I go into rough patch, my place is an absolute mess. I’m embarrassed about it, but my OCD thoughts about recovery are so overwhelming that I lose sight of connecting with the normal part of myself. Once I get over the hurdle, then I start cleaning again. But then I get into another rough patch. This has been going on for years, and I see no way of it ending until I start feeling really well.

You’re not alone, believe me!!

Re: My home is one big mess
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2018, 05:49:56 pm »

[Buddie]

My entire life is in disarray because of this. And it isn’t that I lack the physical ability to do something about it, it is because my organizational skills are so bad that if I move things around I have a very hard time finding them again. The lack of motivation to do anything productive is the icing on the cake. Those two things make it very difficult for me to keep everything clean and organized.

Ashton taper leaves addict paralyzed

struggling to leave my room any adive or input would be helpful
« on: November 15, 2017, 03:46:47 pm »

[Buddie]

ive only been leaving my room for bathroom n shower n to eat n do landry other then those small thing ive spent the better part of the last 5 weeks just laying in bed all day watching movies or tv on my laptop !! monday i got out of the house for about 2 hours just to do some things in the yard n had two attacks while i was outside im on 1.625mg of ativan daily the window started slowly closing on me this summer and has pretty much shut me in my room where i keep all light out so it pitch black n i feel some what at ease still have attacks once a day or more but some days our good days and i dont have any ! has anyone been in this position before ? if so how do i over come it ? i need to be able to atleast get out side cut my grass take the trash out ect !! im in a pretty lucky situation im 31 with no kids or a job and my mom lets me live here for free n pays what little bills i have but i used to do all kinds of remodling projects for her and painting and yard projects but now i cant even cut the grass and input would be very helpful i have everything i need to start a titration but the alcohol to disolve the ativan but havent started because of fear n the situation im in

Shocking real life taper apartment

The above apartment was used for a years-long, failed Valium taper. After a grueling 1600 day micro-taper, directed by online kooks, the addict relapsed on diazepam. He since has been checked (5150’d) into a mental hospital where he is getting needed professional medical help. Shame on the people who let this poor unfortunate suffer in such squalor.

Ashton tapers cause agoraphobia

Missed Appointments
« on: January 13, 2017, 01:23:25 pm »

[Buddie]

Uhhh, I’m kicking myself this morning as I canceled another Psych appointment. It’s an hour drive and I’ve been panicking all night. I have no one to take me but I’m too sick and scared to leave the house. I hope she understands and refills my meds without issue. It seems like when this happens she punishes me by calling all my meds in late or makes me wait out the weekend. Lucky I save rescue pills.

Why can’t we have Skype Dr. appointments when all I’m going there for is prescription refills and no physical exam. It’s so hard to make these appointments. Not just because of the agoraphobia but also the anxiety build up to going. I just can’t make plans because I agonize over them.

Anyone else miss too many appointments Because of anxiety?

Cult superstar Perseverance called to account for fear-mongering

PERSEVERANCE: WHAT EXACTLY ARE YOU TRYING TO ACCOMPLISH IN YOUR POSTS?
« on: July 15, 2016, 02:05:25 pm »

[Buddie]

Assuming these posts aren’t a cut & paste patchwork of various research data obtained from the many resources that exist in cyberspace, I do admire you and appreciate the time and painstaking analysis involved in contributing to the BB.org information collective…

…unfortunately, I find the essence of many posts to be discouraging, disheartening, and offering little to no hope to those severely debilitated and crippled from the hellacious symptomatology of iatrogenic illness, as it exists in benzodiazepine withdrawal.

Words such as “permanent;” “irreversible;” and “learning deficit,” inspire hopelessness, fear, and a deep-seated sense of despair and anguish that isn’t easily resolved or relinquished; in fact, often thrusting the reader into a downward spiral, deeper into the abyss.

The scholarly, didactic verbiage that is necessary and inseparable from professional clinical trial and research writing format, further confuses and exacerbates the reader’s fragile psychological state.

For example:
“In rats given benzodiazepines chronically, the common α 1 γ2 sub-units are down-regulated, while rarer sub-units are elevated proportionately (Holt et al, 1999). It is suggested that transcription of the Gene cluster on Chromosome 5 (which encodes for α1 β2 γ2 sub-units) is inhibited on chronic benzodiazepine administration, while the transcription of the Gene cluster on Chromosome 15 is upregulated (Holt et al, 1999). In certain brain regions, the Chromosome-5-encoded receptor sub-unit proteins are replaced by those encoded in Chromosome 15, which show less sensitivity.” (4)

This excerpt is quite esoteric in nature and would require the highest level of comprehension and routine familiarity found mostly in researchers with PhD’s (not practitioners).

The one thing I’ve learned in neurology is that few things are conclusive or certain. BWS is severely under-researched and much is not fully understood by the medical community.

One question I continually ask myself since joining BB.org is, “How many people have I inadvertently hurt through bad advice?”

If for every 500 I helped, but hurt 1, I would cease to interact any further, simply because it’s not my call to make in weighing human wellness, health, and life.