Klonopin helps dystonia patients

Re: What happened to Benzodiazepine Information Coalition?????
« Reply #17 on: November 23, 2019, 04:52:23 am »

[Buddie]

I don’t think patients should be forced off of benzos. I had severe dystonia symptoms from klonopin withdrawal, and would never wish that on anyone. klonopin and benzos are one of the few meds that can treat dystonia. (dystonia is a movement disorder where your body twists and contorts in unnatural ways). Little kids are screaming in pain as their feet bend backwards, and this can go on for several hours at a time, for some it is non-stop. Benzos should ALWAYS be allowed for that reason, and I went through absolute hell from my prescribed klonopin. That being said, as much as I am against klonopin, had I continued with the severe dystonia movements, I would have gone back on. You are literally trapped in bed with your body twisting painfully in strange ways.

There may also be people with anxiety who are stuck in that fight or flight without benzos. Just like pain meds, some people are helped, or are willing to deal with the risks. What I think is most important is making people aware of the risks before they start the medicine. But I would never want to see a person with bad dystonia from accessing benzos. Basically, think of the pain that shoots through your foot when you smash it against something and bend in backwards until it bruised. That is what dystonia can do, but it keeps it bent for hours at a time. I had times where my legs looked like someone beat the crap out of me from how bad the spasms were. For someone who suffers this on a daily basis, benzos should be available.

Suffering Benzo Buddies member regrets being brainwashed into stopping Valium

Re: What happened to Benzodiazepine Information Coalition?????
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2019, 10:56:08 pm »

[Buddie]

I think it is important to say that for some people it is not the right thing to get off of them

I should never have tried to stop diazepam which I was on the same low dose of for 20 years for muscle spasm from spinal injury and surgery.

WD is literally crushing my spine and I am now paradoxical to all meds.

I had no interdose WD or to,ere veg on the diazepam.

I know ppl in dystonia groups who only get relief from Clonazepam some of whom have been on it for 40 years without problems.

CNN accused of hit job ahead of fearmongering benzo special

“Many, many people living long, productive and happy lives while being dependent upon and using benzos as prescribed”

Re: Watch "This is Life" With Lisa Ling
« Reply #96 on: September 29, 2019, 02:21:11 am »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on September 29, 2019, 01:53:48 am
Quote from: [Buddie] on September 29, 2019, 12:47:21 am
Quote from: [Buddie] on September 29, 2019, 12:40:35 am
Quote from: [Buddie] on September 29, 2019, 12:36:04 am
I’m curious: Does this piece with Lisa Ling address at all, people who live long, productive & happy lives while using long-term benzodiazepines as prescribed?

No it does not. That’s a different show.

Thanks for the quick response. Do you mean Lisa Ling will be doing a different show that reflects the lives of real people who are benzo dependent and continue living long, productive & happy lives? Or do you mean there is no show that you are aware of which reflects this reality that does exist? Thanks in advance.

I’m sure those people exist. Our aim is to let people know the risks, as they will not receive it in the doctors office and are being rapidly tapered. Many people doing well on benzodiazepines became harmed by trying or being forced to stop. And many don’t. This episode is a warning about the drug, not an ode to the drug. I’m unsure if such an ode exists.

You’ve answered my questions and for that I’m appreciative. I will resist the urge to question in detail any motive(s) in you choosing to use the word “ode” to describe the reality of many, many people living long, productive and happy lives while being dependent upon and using benzos as prescribed. I will continue to extend my best wishes.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2019, 02:27:07 am by [Buddie] »

Benzo Buddies targets famous psychologist Jordan Peterson for cult recruitment (N.B.: Scientology also routinely targets celebrities for cult recruitment)

Re: Jordan Peterson is in rehab for Clonazepam
« Reply #16 on: September 20, 2019, 07:31:36 pm »

[Buddie]

maybe this would be a good time to reach out to her? I didn’t care right now about her meat diet. Her father could be goin through what we are going through. They have HUGE platforms. I suggest each of us send her a message wishing him health, sharing some of our story linking to Benzobuddies, , emphasizing the slow taper, and maybe linking to the Ashton manual. His politics and her beliefs are of no concern to me, just as I don’t “care” what any of yours are (in terms of my hope for your healing).

You could do this because it COULD help our cause, or else because it could help a fellow sufferer. Just a thought.

Re: Jordan Peterson is in rehab for Clonazepam
« Reply #17 on: September 20, 2019, 09:31:34 pm »

[Buddie]

Here is the email I sent to Dr. Peterson’s daughter’s public email:

Mikhaila,

I’m so very sorry that you are dealing with your father’s klonopin issue, and so soon after your mother’s illness. I too am dependent on klonopin and I am working to get free. I took them as my doctor prescribed and was shocked to find I could not quit. Unfortunately most rehab centers believe in rapid taper, where you are quickly taken off the drug, often with other harmful drugs added to the mix.

This rarely works and often leads to long term damage.

The only safe way to heal from physical dependence (which is very different than addiction) is to slowly taper down. Addiction is a craving and can possibly be overcome by willpower, dependence is physiological and can happen with klonopin in as little as 4 weeks. It doesnÂ’t matter if it was used as prescribed or not. The dependency issue is the same.

Tapering, the slow reduction of the drug over months, is the only way to safely get through this without causing further (and perhaps permanent damage).

I would refer you to the best manual on benzo withdrawal, the Ashton Manual.

https://benzo.org.uk/manual/index.htm

The webpage is a little old fashioned but the information is critical.

Also, the best support group, with people who can supply tapering schedules, advice, info on supplements and drugs to avoid, etc is:

http://www.benzobuddies.org

Please reach out for help, quitting a benzo is not like quitting any other drug on earth.

I’m here if you have any questions.

Klonopin for 10 days, Benzo Buddies for life

Re: HELP!! Do I need to taper?
« Reply #11 on: August 28, 2019, 07:04:41 pm »

RKO

Not trying to scare you but I was only on Klonopin for 10 days and my doctor wouldn’t allow me to do an Ashton taper because I was only on for such a short time.

I was hooked by day 7, unknowingly, when I took half a dose one night and woke up with heart palps. Damn pills nearly killed me when I quit after a rapid taper that was basically a CT.

It’s been over 15 months and I’m nowhere near healed.

I’ve come to realize, however, that I am in the extreme minority. You’ll probably be fine though.

Paxil: 2000-2007
2/08: Adverse reaction to 9 days of Saw Palmetto extract for hair loss (PFS)
Klonopin: .25mg PRN 2/08-7/08
Prozac: 11/08-3/09

Drug free for 9+ years, life was great

4/19: Severe ear infection, temporarily deaf, tinnitus – rx Augmentin

4/26-5/1: Steroid taper pack

4/26-5/5: Rx Klonopin .5mg nightly by ENT for insomnia/tinnitus (heart palps on Day 7 with .25mg, dependent in a week?!)
5/6: Cut to .25 mg (cut 1mg tabs into quarters) – BAD symptoms. Run to GP for help
5/10: Cut to .125mg (per GP advice) – even worse symptoms, bad advice from doc
5/13: Jumped. WAY TOO SOON. HELL. Should’ve reinstated, basically CT. Didn’t have sufficient supply, GP wouldn’t prescribe more. Wrongly assumed short use would be short WD

Benzo Buddies member goes back on benzos after brutal Ashton taper fails and is doing great!

a lifetime of decisions, and a long weird path back towards reinstatement
« on: July 17, 2019, 06:37:35 pm »

[Buddie]

Hello,

I had initially kept this post to a handful of staff members, but was encouraged to feel free to make a more public post.

Put simply, I am back on benzodiazepines after an extended period off, and while I have deep reservations about this, after eight months it does not yet seem to have been a mistake.

Abbreviated backstory: I was on benzos for a number of years in late adolescence / early adulthood for anxiety based reasons. I had mild tinnitus at that time (possibly attributable to many things, including a distant history of childhood ear infections). Tapering was brutal and took me 14 months, and I wrapped that up sometime in 2005. I don’t recall tinnitus ever being a problem, except briefly during parts of the taper.

In 2010, an acoustic trauma did some significant damage to my auditory system, the tinnitus turned into a wailing monster, and I used benzos again for about a year before tapering again. I spent 2011-2015 basically miserable, highly functional but chronically consumed with the violent, often painful, extremely high pitched noise in my skull. I tried all kinds of things; if there is a supplement, drug, medical practice, massage practice, alternative medicine practice that someone on Google says helped their tinnitus, I probably tried it. I also tried doing “nothing”; I learned to meditate. I learned to sleep with earplugs in spite of the noise. I spent a lot of money; I spent $10,000 to be a lab rat in one clinical trial alone (lots of travel involved).

I remain hopeful about the tinnitus treatments that are in the pipeline, but a little voice continued to say “I need to do something now”, as my life sort of passed before my eyes. I achieved significant professional success. I was able to relocate out the city to a pristine, quiet area in 2016. This did all make me feel better in some ways, but still the noise.

In late 2015, unrelated medical circumstances forced me to consider short-term PRN use of Valium, and, of course, I discovered that it still “worked” as far as taking my mind off the tinnitus. From early 2016 until November of last year, I used Valium PRN; when the tinnitus would become absolutely intolerable, I would take enough to knock it way back (usually 10-20mg over 24-36hrs), and then try to not do that again for 3-4 weeks. I became a parent over this time period, and I realized that the times I was the most medicated were also the times I felt the most joy and connection with my child. By July of 2018, I was agonizing over the idea of reinstatement, but I wasn’t sure.

I made a list of every possible tinnitus remedy that seemed reasonably attested which had not yet been attempted. It was a pretty short list which included some out there ideas like “cervical chiropracty” and “microdose psilocyban”. None the less, I crossed these items off my list as I tried them. Finally, in late November of last year, well supported by a medical team (including a prescribing doctor who is deeply aware of the hazards of benzos and necessity of a slow withdrawal), I elected to resume daily benzo use. After 2 weeks at 25% of the dose I’d previously been on long term, things felt very bad; more or less, I felt like I was in withdrawal, and I almost aborted the experiment then and there. One of my medical team persuaded me to at least attempt my full prior dose for some period of time; I also elected to supplement it with gabapentin based on some research into the combination for tinnitus specifically (and the general observation that gabapentin is much less scary than benzos, so if it can be used to supplement a benzo dose and reduce benzo consumption, that’s probably a win).

More or less I had a one month “honeymoon” where life seemed too good to be true, and as expected, that faded as tolerance became obvious and peripheral side effects also vanished. However, what I am left with, so far, is a life which is much more manageable. It’s hard to put numbers on things, but the tinnitus is more distant, it’s generally less disturbing when it does get my attention, and I’ve been able to make significant progress in my family life, in my professional life, and in therapy, which had been blocked by the state of utter discomfort, misery and despair that my tinnitus had thrown me into. The general observation of my spouse is that I am easier to talk to, more likely to listen to them, less likely to snap, and more likely to be sympathetic and caring in general.

To make a few things clear:
This was my choice and I would not encourage anyone else to do the same thing. No one’s circumstances are identical. For all I know, my use of benzos during developmental years caused problems that couldn’t self-fix, and if not for that I might not be in this situation at all. Likewise, if I had taken better care of my ears, or had better genetics around hearing, tinnitus and anxiety, I might not be in this situation. But, that doesn’t matter: the way things are, is the way things are.

I do not know the long term results of this (and neither do you) – I waited more than six months before posting this because I wanted to be sure a beneficial effect that outweighed my reservations about benzo use, would persist for some period of time after obvious tolerance had set in. It’s entirely possible that this will “stop working” at some point, and I will be left with my generally terrifying tinnitus on top of having to do another taper. But, it’s also possible that won’t happen (one of my family members has taken Klonopin with no loss of efficiency for more than 15 years) – and it’s further possible that some of the tinnitus treatments which are currently in the experimental or early marketing phase will turn out to be extremely effective, at which point attempting another taper might seem very rational to me.

I agonized over this decision more than you can possibly imagine over a five year period; eight months in, it’s given me eight of the best months of the last 10 years of my life. I am happy to answer any reasonable questions, but I ask that you respect my right to autonomy and decision making over my own body.