Benzo Buddies pothead loves grass, “super sad” not to be smoking it anymore, swears Klonopin takes edge off marijuana-induced panic attacks

Re: Can marijuana help through benzo withdrawal?
« Reply #124 on: March 30, 2017, 12:26:47 am »

[Buddie]

Marijuana elevates heart rate and therefore can trigger a panic attack. I was a daily pot smoker and 90 percent of the times I was great except for random bug outs. Klonopin took that edge off. Then when I was tapering in the fall I got massive attacks every time I smoked. My cold turkey was so bad in January I didn’t even bother trying it. I smoked one little hit the other night and my heart went[…]. I hear what you are saying about being hungry prior to smoking and how it can cause some anxiety that’s a real thing. But I don’t think pot is useful for benzo withdrawals. I love marijuana and I’m super sad to not be smoking it anymore. I don’t think it’s harmful, but I’d rather avoid a panic attack or chest discomfort. I may try some edibles at some point. I researched this to death because I so miss smoking it but from everything I’ve read it doesn’t seem conducive to the brain healing post benzos. If you try and it works for you congrats. Let me know how it goes. Lol

“The only thing that helped was Klonopin”

Is this mania?
« on: September 19, 2016, 04:42:22 am »

[Buddie]

2 weeks ago I went to the er because I felt like I was loosing my mind, I felt like adrenaline was cranked through me all day, it was very scary my mind was racing 1 hundred miles an hour, obsessed thoughts, no sleep needed no meds could calm me down, went back on the seroquel for a few days felt a lot better, this all happened when I stopped the buspar and seroquel for a few weeks, I went up on my dose in buspar today same feeling are starting but my seroquel famed it down, is this bipolar mania? Still trying to diagnose me because my anxiety is so bad with mood changes and depression, only thing that helped was klonopin but weont prescribe it I have been off of it a month and a half after tapering, I’m just wondering if my anxiety is so bad from bipolar?

A ‘benzo epidemic’ without any victims

There are no reliable (or for that matter unreliable) statistics on the number of people allegedly victimized by Big Pharma’s benzodiazepines. The claim of millions of benzo victims is based solely on dogma created by the infamous Scientology front group mis-named Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR). If you ask any of Ashton disciples to provide evidence, of their claim, they inevitably fumble and the offer nothing but a litany of excuses on why there is no evidence to back up their spurious nonsense. Yet, if you join one of their ridiculous benzo victim groups you will hear cult acolytes repeat – like mindless sheep – that millions are suffering. They’re suffering all right – suffering delusions.

Science wins again: No causal association between benzodiazepine use and dementia

Do Benzodiazepines Increase the Risk for Dementia?

Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle have published a longitudinal observational study examining whether higher cumulative use of benzodiazepines is associated with increased risk for dementia or rate of cognitive decline.[1]

They studied 3434 participants, age 65 or older, who were dementia-free at study onset, and followed them for 7 years. Cognitive screening was carried out every 2 years, and benzodiazepine use was assessed via computerized pharmacy data over a 10-year period.

During follow-up, 797 participants (23%) developed dementia, and 637 (80%) of these developed Alzheimer disease.

The researchers found no association between the highest level of benzodiazepine use and dementia or cognitive decline. They did find a small increased risk for dementia in subjects with low (up to 1 month) or moderate (between 1 and 4 months) use, which the researchers attributed to treating prodromal or early symptoms of Alzheimer disease.

They concluded that these results do not support a causal association between benzodiazepine use and dementia. However, they still emphasize that benzodiazepine use in older adults carries risks of adverse health outcomes, withdrawal, and dependence.

1. Gray SL, Dublin S, Yu O, et al. Benzodiazepine use and risk of incident dementia or cognitive decline: prospective population based study. BMJ. 2016 Feb 2;352:i90.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/861546