Brainwashed Benzo Buddies members check soap, deodorant, perfume for alcohol

I have a theory...
« on: July 14, 2017, 07:39:22 am »

[Buddie]

Considering that any tiny bit of alcohol on things like deodorant, soap, perfume can cause a noticeable effect on me. Should we use GABAA Antagonists to balance things out? Or does natural glutamate from food already helps? Like, when people drink Alcohol and they have a flare up that last for days, they heal that flare up from eating???

what do you think?
« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 05:50:53 pm by [Buddie] »

Re: I have a theory...
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2017, 07:51:11 pm »

[Buddie]

I think you should look for soaps, and deodorants that don’t contain alcohol. Read the back of the products and look. Or call the 800 # listed on the back. And give up the perfumes since most do contain alcohol. Maybe some do not, but I don’t know since I don’t wear any myself.

And for heavens sake, don’t take any gaba a antagonists “to balance things out.” You’re off the benzos and gabapentin, so just get on with life. “Gaba antagonists are drugs that inhibit the action of gaba and produce stimulant and convulsive effects. They”re used mainly for counteracting overdoses of sedative drugs.” (Slight paraphrasing from Wikipedia; you can read this yourself.)

Natural food with glutamate is a good thing no matter what the circumstances. And many people who have withdrawn from benzos can never drink alcohol again while many others can. It depends on numerous factors-genetics, how hard withdrawl was, number of withdrawl attempts, number of “brain meds” involved and more. It’s really an individual thing as we’re all different people with different Central Nervous Systems.

So your “theory” is what exactly?

Seasonal allergies affect benzo withdrawal?

Are seasonal allergies worse during withdrawal?
« on: May 24, 2017, 01:42:03 am »

[Buddie]

The past two years I’ve had what I’ve assumed were horrible seasonal allergies. It’s mainly sinus pressure and congestion. I also feel like my ears have water in them, but when I’ve had them checked the doc doesn’t see anything. I know benzo withdrawal causes a host of problems and affects the immune system. Wondering what the science involved is with the allergies being so bad. I’ve had no sinus or ear infections but sometimes the pressure between my eyes is just unbearable. Any thoughts?

Re: Are seasonal allergies worse during withdrawal?
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2017, 01:43:42 am »

[Buddie]

I think so, its been YEARS since mine have been this bad.

Re: Are seasonal allergies worse during withdrawal?
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2017, 09:07:14 pm »

[Buddie]

Yes, mine have been worse this year since I got off benzos. I think withdrawal can ramp up any other health issues we have. I think maybe that withdrawal puts us in an inflammatory, reactive state and our bodies can over react to all kinds of things-old and new…ugh.

Ashton disciples claim bug spray revs them up

Bug Spray
« on: May 18, 2017, 01:10:03 pm »

[Buddie]

I used a little bug spray yesterday night and I swear it reved up my symptoms so badly. Nerve pain was out of control!!!

Could it have been the chemicals in the spray? It had DEET in it too.

Re: Bug Spray
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2017, 08:30:36 pm »

[Buddie]

It could be. Some people have claimed sensitivity to solvents during withdrawal (e.g. fresh paint or cleaning solvents).

Glade air freshener = Satan

“Near the bed was a plugin Glade air freshener. I unplugged it and crossed my fingers that my symptoms would calm down. I did fall asleep eventually, but it wasn’t a pleasant night.”

Air Fresheners And Other Fiascos

Kooks fear mouthwash

Mouth wash! Ever had any issues?
« on: August 06, 2016, 01:10:25 am »

[Buddie]

I am trying to clean my mouth before applying a temporary filling . Most mouthwash have alcohol in them . I won’t be drinking it but is it safe to use without revving up symptom ?

No addict should be allowed to get behind the wheel and endanger others

Most of the benzodiazepine addicts, that haunt Benzo Buddies and the secret Facebook groups, describe themselves as totally disabled: needing to crawl to the bathroom, experiencing auditory and visual hallucinations, unable to walk (Alee Sun/Ally Nugent claims she needs a walker years off benzos), claims that a single apple causes a night of myoclonic jerking and that a stick of chewing gum can send them into months-long waves, etc. Why should they be allowed to drive? Do you want to share the road with some poor, mentally ill drug addict who thinks Kentucky Fried Chicken is a government plot to poison them?

During their often years-long tapers, they should lose their driving privileges. As many addicts relapse, post-taper they should be subject to random drug testing – as a condition of the taper. This should be enforced by the state and the prescribing doctor.

Society has to be protected from drug abusers who break the law and drive just as we protect it from drunk drivers.

Norway test drivers for BZO
« on: July 13, 2016, 07:05:52 am »

[Buddie]

http://www.aftenbladet.no/nyheter/Dette-apparatet-har-gitt-UP-en-ny-og-skremmende-rekord-for-ruskjoring-3960544.html

OMG, the repercussions this will have to people who have been off the drug for weeks will be jailed/fine for driving under the influence of BZO, unlike a alcohol test this does not measure a percentage, but just the fact its in your system. I can understand this for truck drives, public transport, but to random test drivers for BZO is outrageous. Because of the fact it not measured in percentage to lawfully drive. Someone who has been off the drug will test for weeks and weeks.

Re: Norway test drivers for BZO
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2016, 08:03:35 am »

[Buddie]

This is actually what got my mother to start her tapering! She put her car in the garage and started the day she found out! I imagine that she is not the only one!

Re: Norway test drivers for BZO
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2016, 08:09:27 am »

[Buddie]

http://nhi.no/livsstil/helsetjenesten/diverse/forerkort-og-b-preparater-35928.html
This thread may be useful to see how it actually will effect drivers with the new rules!

Re: Norway test drivers for BZO
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2016, 08:32:06 am »

[Buddie]

Problem is there is no way to detect the percentage of the drug BZO in your system, unlike driving with illegal drugs, which is understandable, BZO will test you positive, even weeks after stopping, So you will be charged with driving as if you took 3 or 4 10 mg doses, make no difference whether or not you stopped weeks ago. The time and money involved to clear you would be enormous, let alone the jail time and fine, maybe you could win in court but that would be a long and expensive road, and for those that cannot afford will suffer the wrath of the judicial system. I really am frustrated people using BZO prescribed are targeted the same as ifusing cocain or crack or any other illegal drug!

A day in the life of an Ashton cultist

  1. take drugs
  2. plot revenge on doctors/psychiatrists
  3. take more drugs
  4. sit on Facebook commiserating with other accidental addicts
  5. take more drugs
  6. wallow in self-pity
  7. take more drugs
  8. go on rant in tiny Facebook group that fantasizes about a legal case – that will never happen – against Big Pharma
  9. take more drugs
  10. check Benzo Buddies to see if anyone else has been sent into a giant wave by hairspray or bottled water
  11. take more drugs
  12. create an art book no one but other people in the cult will ever see
  13. take more drugs
  14. pretend to other cult members you’re smarter than a doctor or a psychiatrist
  15. take more drugs
  16. plan to taper for 10-20 years, then become protracted
  17. take more drugs
  18. worship one doctor named Ashton – who treated less that 400 patients, most of which were on other drugs – as a demi-god
  19. take more drugs
  20. deny you ever abused illegal drugs, like LSD
  21. take more drugs
  22. scan the media for any mention of benzos, then fly into a rage if a TV show offends you
  23. take more drugs
  24. be afraid, be very afraid, of butter
  25. take more drugs
  26. deny your psychiatrist’s diagnosis because mental illness does not exist
  27. take more drugs
  28. deny any connection to Scientology/CCHR but repeat exactly what they say about drugs/psychiatry
  29. take more drugs
  30. pass out at your computer

Benzo Buddies-induced food phobias burn out of control

Fatigue after eating
« on: January 31, 2016, 02:03:21 pm »

[Buddie]

I saw a post about this but it was dated more than a couple of years ago so I decided to post a new one.

This past week I’ve noticed that I suddenly feel exhausted and weak right after I have my dinner. I can barely drag myself to bed I feel so tired and groggy. It does eases up in a couple of hours and it’s not so bad during the day. Anyone else experience this? Anything that might help?
« Last Edit: January 31, 2016, 02:25:36 pm by [Buddie] »

Re: Fatigue after eating
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2016, 06:33:13 pm »

[Buddie]

Could it be what you are eating or does it happen no matter what you eat? It could be your body working hard to digest. I notice symptoms with eating as well…..sometimes I feel more revved up and feel a strange tremor or vibration through my body.

Re: Fatigue after eating
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2016, 06:59:04 pm »

[Buddie]

Eating and digestion are a huge tax on the body. Many people, including myself, report an increase in all kinds of symptoms due to eating. All part of the deal. I try to avoid putting stuff in my stomach as much as I can, cause it really revs me up .

EMERGENCY ROOM NIGHTMARE

Anyone else been told this?
« on: January 17, 2016, 09:13:40 pm »

[Buddie]

Night before last i went to the ER and the doctor there told me that after 2 weeks off of xanax, the symptoms I’m having are no longer physical. He thinks I’m no longer in the acute phase of withdrawal and that it’s all anxiety causing the symptoms. This doesn’t make a lot of sense to me for a few reasons.
1. He doesn’t have any idea how bad my anxiety is or what it’s been like during my taper.
2. I’ve had these same symptoms at the worst parts of the taper.
3. I was feeling bad, but bearable, and then suddenly I woke up feeling awful a couple days ago, so why would it just pop up out of nowhere?
4. I don’t doubt anxiety contributes to symptoms, but to cause all of this by itself seems like too much. I’ve had anxiety make me nauseous, but not all of this.
5. That’s the first time I’ve heard anyone say that after two weeks, the symptoms would be gone.
6. Everyone I’ve talked to here on the site has said it may take months for things to disappear.

This guy bragged first thing that he and his team were experts on withdrawal of all kinds. I listed off my symptoms to him and he said “all the things your having are not typical withdrawal symptoms. We don’t associate these with withdrawal at all”

okay, so nausea isnt?
tremors arent?
headaches?
dizziness?
on and on
none of those are withdrawal symptoms? I guess millions of people are full of shit then
how could a doctor think this?
thats the most ridiculous thing ive ever heard

i laid on a bed for six hours crying and shaking, trying not to throw up, waiting to be seen at all, and then this idiot tells me its all in my head and that everything ive gone through for 7 months is nothing.

Re: Anyone else been told this?
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2016, 09:21:20 pm »

[Buddie]

Don’t believe it

It’s real!

Re: Anyone else been told this?
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2016, 09:30:35 pm »

[Buddie]

What absolute nonsense! This guy knows nothing about benzos. :crazy: Two weeks off is, unfortunately, just the beginning for many of us.

Re: Anyone else been told this?
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2016, 09:35:11 pm »

[Buddie]

I was told the same thing the one time I went to the ER shortly after my own Xanax taper was finished. I had extremely high blood pressure and my doctor had told me to go if it got that high.

I was treated very patronizingly by the hospital staff, diagnosed with panic attack (it was not) and offered Klonopin. I sat in a chair, a nurse came in and patted me on the shoulder and took my BP …for $1500.

In a way it is anxiety, but it’s not the type of anxiety he’s referring to. Your central nervous system is pretty fragile and any little thing is likely to set you off.

Benzodiazepine withdrawal is an animal of a different nature and from what I’ve heard and seen, few ER docs or other medical personnel are ‘experts’.

Most people here consider the first month off to be acute. That was about how long it took my worst symptoms to settle down… probably four to six weeks and then things got easier.

Re: Anyone else been told this?
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2016, 09:38:58 pm »

[Buddie]

Laura I’m sorry you are suffering bad enough to go to the ER for help. Yours is a sad but familiar story about clueless health care professionals who don’t know anything about benzo withdrawal. The level of ignorance is truly shocking. How can this be after 50 years? You can understand how your friends and family who don’t have a medical background might be clueless, but doctors? It makes for a lonely and solitary journey with very little empathy and understanding, except for this forum.

:smitten:
[…]

Re: Anyone else been told this?
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2016, 09:40:37 pm »

[Buddie]

He is exaggerating about being an “expert”. Most ER docs I have ever seen arent very benzo educated.