I would be more than happy to do therapy sessions via Skype

Therapy via Skype?
« on: December 31, 2016, 05:00:58 am »

[Buddie]

This is just a shot in the dark but I was wondering if anyone knew of any therapists or services that offer therapy sessions via Skype. During my taper I’ve developed agoraphobia because of constant depersonalization and as a result I’ve gotten in the habit of cancelling appointments at the last minute. I don’t know why insurance doesn’t cover appointment s via Skype or even by phone but they don’t.

I have Claire Weekes’ book on agoraphobia and I should read it again but with the cog fog that is difficult.

Site mascot Sicko Flicko became a benzo legend after his testicle was shot off during drug deal gone bad

Re: Tofu 'may raise risk of dementia'
« Reply #46 on: September 20, 2010, 09:06:54 PM »

mike59

flick tell us about when your testicle was shot off after surfing . that’s more entertaining

Re: Tofu 'may raise risk of dementia'
« Reply #47 on: September 20, 2010, 09:12:47 PM »

Flick

Mike always falls back on ridiculous lies when he has nowhere to go, I had one testicle injured falling on my board in a surfing accident and had surgery to repair it. was very painful, but only a piece of it was removed. like I said, the troll will try to bury anything really informative or interesting by posting a series of inane posts. i guess i will have to keep pasting that article for awhile in case someone with half brain wants to read it and learn some interesting things. If you feel like you are a drug addict, then speak for yourself. Flick

Cult maniac identified as person who originally gave out anti-cult fighter’s personal info so his family could be harassed

Re: Please remove my membership and blog
« Reply #27 on: September 25, 2011 at 05:59:09 PM »

Dukesmommy

I’m confused. Gail was in on this from the very beginning, as a matter of fact. She and Jon were the instigators of the entire chain of events at BW. She was the one who gave out Mike59’s personal information to everyone so they could post it all over BW and other places on the internet. Many players who play innocent but are guilty behind the scenes, as I previously mentioned. Don’t forget that she was a moderator for a short time at BE. I had occasion to witness her intense hate for Mike59. There is no question in my mind that she is deeply involved in this current feud.

Another thing that I am confused about is why we would need to bring Ross in on all of this. He has managed to stay out of all of it completely, having most of these people, save Flick, as members of his forum. What would his forum have to do with you encouraging me to ban Mike59? Also, are you saying that you would be willing to ban Donny?

Yes, we are not 100% sure of who is completely involved. Like I said, there are many players and none are innocent.

There is Jon, Gail, Flick, Robyn Hayle, Jim (Befuddled), Jannie Tyme (Whoopsie) and maybe others that I don’t know about. Zoe, although she is not a member on BE as far as I can see and I don’t know whether she is a member here. If you banned Mike59 as a gesture to the members of BW then you do know that there were others that caused many problems there too.
I’m not sure of your reasoning behind that gesture, to be honest.

TC is a moot point since he is already banned from most all forums. I’m sure he rubbishes everyone he can if he gets mad at them. He has issues. I haven’t been to TRAP in years except to make sure my account was secure there a few weeks ago and to ask for his help with a woman in his country who has subsequently passed away last fall.

Again, I am making the gesture/offer. We may never do it perfectly but it is the fairest thing to do. Whether BW or TRAP participates or not, it will send a message that we will no longer stand for what is happening, that we have a common goal and that is to stand up for what is right, and get on with encouraging, supporting and helping others in withdrawal.

IN PRAISE OF VALIUM

  • Valium much less sedating than its predecessors Miltown or Librium (Before Valium came along, millions of Americans begged their doctors for Miltown prescriptions. By 1957, a prescription for Miltown was filled an average of every second in the U.S. Suburbs became the site for Miltown parties, cocktails were named for the pill – a Miltown replaced the olive in a Miltini – and high-end jewelers designed rings with compartments to hold the “tranks.” In 1960, Swiss drug maker Hoffmann-La Roche unveiled Librium, less sedating than Miltown but just as calming. In one famous experiment, the bitter-tasting drug tamed lions and tigers at the San Diego Zoo.)
  • By the end of the 1960s, Valium was the top-selling psychotropic drug in the United States
  • Valium quickly surpassed Miltown and Librium
  • Among Valium’s biggest selling points: no bitter taste, and it was nearly impossible to overdose on (In one widely reported instance that came much later, a Reagan administration official tried to kill himself with a heavy dose of Valium but failed.)
  • In the 1970s, Valium became the most widely prescribed drug of any kind
  • Valium was everywhere: Mike Brady popped a couple on the television show “The Brady Bunch,” and the Rolling Stones composed an ode to the drug, dubbing it “Mother’s Little Helper”
  • Ten of millions of people with anxiety disorders have been able to lead normal lives due to Valium
  • Dr. Leo Sternbach a medical hero who deserves posthumous Nobel Prize in Medicine
Diazepam

Diazepam /daɪˈæzɨpæm/, first marketed as Valium /ˈvæliəm/ by Hoffmann-La Roche, is a benzodiazepine drug.

It is commonly used to treat anxiety, panic attacks, insomnia, seizures (including status epilepticus), muscle spasms (such as in tetanus cases), restless legs syndrome, alcohol withdrawal, benzodiazepine withdrawal, opiate withdrawal syndrome and Ménière’s disease. It may also be used before certain medical procedures (such as endoscopies) to reduce tension and anxiety, and in some surgical procedures to induce amnesia.

It possesses anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, hypnotic, sedative, skeletal muscle relaxant, and amnestic properties. The pharmacological action of diazepam enhances the effect of the neurotransmitter GABA by binding to the benzodiazepine site on the GABAA receptor (via the constituent chlorine atom) leading to central nervous system depression.

Adverse effects of diazepam include anterograde amnesia (especially at higher doses) and sedation, as well as paradoxical effects such as excitement, rage or worsening of seizures in epileptics. Benzodiazepines also can cause or worsen depression. Long-term effects of benzodiazepines such as diazepam include tolerance, benzodiazepine dependence and benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome upon dose reduction. After cessation of benzodiazepines, cognitive deficits may persist for at least six months and it was suggested that longer than six months may be needed for recovery from some deficits. Diazepam also has physical dependence potential and can cause serious problems of physical dependence with long term use. Compared to other benzodiazepines, though, physical withdrawal from diazepam following long term use is usually far more mild due to its long elimination half-life. Diazepam is the drug of choice for treating benzodiazepine dependence, with its low potency, long duration of action and the availability of low-dose tablets making it ideal for gradual dose reduction and the circumvention of withdrawal symptoms.

Advantages of diazepam are a rapid onset of action and high efficacy rates, which is important for managing acute seizures, anxiety attacks and panic attacks; benzodiazepines also have a relatively low toxicity in overdose. Diazepam is a core medicine in the World Health Organization’s Essential Drugs List, which list minimum medical needs for a basic health care system. Diazepam, first synthesized by Leo Sternbach,  is used to treat a wide range of conditions, and has been one of the most frequently prescribed medications in the world since its launch in 1963.

Medical uses

Diazepam is mainly used to treat anxiety, insomnia, and symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal. It is also used as a premedication for inducing sedation, anxiolysis or amnesia before certain medical procedures (e.g., endoscopy).

Intravenous diazepam or lorazepam are first line treatments for status epilepticus; However, lorazepam has advantages over diazepam, including a higher rate of terminating seizures and a more prolonged anticonvulsant effect. Diazepam is rarely used for the long-term treatment of epilepsy because tolerance to its anticonvulsant effects usually develops within six to 12 months of treatment, effectively rendering it useless for that purpose. Diazepam is used for the emergency treatment of eclampsia, when IV magnesium sulfate and blood pressure control measures have failed. Benzodiazepines do not have any pain-relieving properties themselves, and are generally recommended to avoid in individuals with pain.  However, benzodiazepines such as diazepam can be used for their muscle-relaxant properties to alleviate pain caused by muscle spasms and various dystonias, including blepharospasm. Tolerance often develops to the muscle relaxant effects of benzodiazepines such as diazepam. Baclofen or tizanidine is sometimes used as an alternative to diazepam.

The anticonvulsant effects of diazepam can help in the treatment of seizures due to a drug overdose or chemical toxicity as a result of exposure to sarin, VX, soman (or other organophosphate poisons; See #CANA), lindane, chloroquine, physostigmine, or pyrethroids Diazepam is sometimes used intermittently for the prophylaxis of febrile seizures caused by high fever in children and neonates under five years of age.  Long-term use of diazepam for the management of epilepsy is not recommended; however, a subgroup individuals with treatment resistant epilepsy benefit from long-term benzodiazepines and for such individuals clorazepate has been recommended due to its slower onset of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effects.

Diazepam has a broad spectrum of indications (most of which are off-label), including:

  • Treatment of neurovegetative symptoms associated with vertigo
  • Treatment of the symptoms of alcohol, opiate and benzodiazepine withdrawal
  • Short-term treatment of insomnia
  • Treatment of tetanus, together with other measures of intensive treatment
  • Adjunctive treatment of spastic muscular paresis (paraplegia/tetraplegia) caused by cerebral or spinal cord conditions such as stroke, multiple sclerosis, or spinal cord injury (long-term treatment is coupled with other rehabilitative measures)
  • Palliative treatment of stiff person syndrome
  • Pre- or postoperative sedation, anxiolysis and/or amnesia (e.g., before endoscopic or surgical procedures)
  • Treatment of complications with a hallucinogen crisis and stimulant overdoses and psychosis, such as LSD, cocaine, or methamphetamine.
  • Prophylactic treatment of oxygen toxicity during hyperbaric oxygen therapy

Dosages should be determined on an individual basis, depending upon the condition being treated, severity of symptoms, patient body weight, and any comorbid conditions the patient may have.[13]

Availability

Diazepam is marketed in over 500 brands throughout the world. It is supplied in oral, injectable, inhalation and rectal forms.

The United States military employs a specialized diazepam preparation known as CANA (Convulsive Antidote, Nerve Agent), which contains diazepam. One CANA kit is typically issued to service members, along with three Mark I NAAK kits, when operating in circumstances where chemical weapons in the form of nerve agents are considered a potential hazard. Both of these kits deliver drugs using autoinjectors. They are intended for use in “buddy aid” or “self aid” administration of the drugs in the field prior to decontamination and delivery of the patient to definitive medical care.

History

Diazepam was the second benzodiazepine invented by Dr. Leo Sternbach of Hoffmann-La Roche at the company’s Nutley, New Jersey, facility following chlordiazepoxide (Librium), which was approved for use in 1960. Released in 1963 as an improved version of Librium, diazepam became incredibly popular, helping Roche to become a pharmaceutical industry giant. It is 2.5 times more potent than its predecessor, which it quickly surpassed in terms of sales. After this initial success, other pharmaceutical companies began to introduce other benzodiazepine derivatives.

The benzodiazepines gained popularity among medical professionals as an improvement upon barbiturates, which have a comparatively narrow therapeutic index, and are far more sedating at therapeutic doses. The benzodiazepines are also far less dangerous; death rarely results from diazepam overdose, except in cases where it is consumed with large amounts of other depressants (such as alcohol or other sedatives). Benzodiazepine drugs such as diazepam initially had widespread public support, but with time the view changed to one of growing criticism and calls for restrictions on their prescription.

Diazepam was the top-selling pharmaceutical in the United States from 1969 to 1982, with peak sales in 1978 2.3 billion tablets. Diazepam, along with oxazepam, nitrazepam and temazepam, represents 82% of the benzodiazepine market in Australia. While psychiatrists continue to prescribe diazepam for the short-term relief of anxiety, neurology has taken the lead in prescribing diazepam for the palliative treatment of certain types of epilepsy and spastic activity, for example, forms of paresis. It is also the first line of defense for a rare disorder called stiff-person syndrome. In recent years, the public perception of benzodiazepines has become increasingly negative.

Recreational use

Diazepam is a drug of potential abuse and can cause serious problems of addiction and as a result is scheduled. Urgent action by national governments has been recommended to improve prescribing patterns of benzodiazepines such as diazepam. A single dose of diazepam modulates the dopamine system in similar ways to how morphine and alcohol modulate the dopaminergic pathways. Between 50 and 64% of rats will self administer diazepam. Benzodiazepines including diazepam in animal studies have been shown to increase reward-seeking behaviours by increasing impulsivity, which may suggest an increased risk of addictive behavioural patterns with usage of diazepam or other benzodiazepines. In addition, diazepam has been shown to be able to substitute for the behavioural effects of barbiturates in a primate study.  Diazepam has been found as an adulterant in heroin.

Diazepam drug misuse can occur either through recreational misuse where the drug is taken to achieve a high or when the drug is continued long term against medical advice.

Sometimes, it is used by stimulant users to “come down” and sleep and to help control the urge to binge.

A large-scale, nationwide study conducted by SAMHSA found benzodiazepines in the USA are the most frequently abused pharmaceutical, with 35% of drug-related visits to the emergency department involving benzodiazepines.

They are more commonly abused than opiate pharmaceuticals, which accounted for 32% of visits to the emergency department. Males abuse benzodiazepines as commonly as females. Of drugs used in attempted suicide, benzodiazepines are the most commonly used pharmaceutical drug, with 26% of attempted suicides involving benzodiazepines. The most commonly abused benzodiazepine is, however, alprazolam. Clonazepam is the second-most-abused benzodiazepine. Lorazepam is the third-most-abused benzodiazepine, and diazepam the fourth-most-abused benzodiazepine in the USA.

Benzodiazepines, including diazepam, nitrazepam, and flunitrazepam, account for the largest volume of forged drug prescriptions in Sweden, a total of 52% of drug forgeries being for benzodiazepines.

Diazepam was detected in 26% of cases of people suspected of driving under the influence of drugs in Sweden, and its active metabolite nordazepam was detected in 28% of cases. Other benzodiazepines and zolpidem and zopiclone also were found in high numbers. Many drivers had blood levels far exceeding the therapeutic dose range, suggesting a high degree of abuse potential for benzodiazepines and zolpidem and zopiclone. In Northern Ireland in cases where drugs were detected in samples from impaired drivers who were not impaired by alcohol, benzodiazepines were found in 87% of cases. Diazepam was the most commonly detected benzodiazepine.

Legal status

Diazepam is regulated in most countries as a prescription drug:

  • International: diazepam is a Schedule IV controlled drug under the Convention on Psychotropic Substances
  • UK: classified as a controlled drug, listed under Schedule IV, Part I (CD Benz POM) of the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001, allowing possession with a valid prescription. The Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 makes it illegal to possess the drug without a prescription, and for such purposes it is classified as a Class C drug. “List of Controlled Drugs”
  • Germany: classified as a prescription drug, or in high dosage as a restricted drug (Betäubungsmittelgesetz, Anhang III)
Judicial executions

The State of California offers diazepam to condemned inmates as a pre-execution sedative as part of their lethal injection program.

Veterinary uses

Diazepam is used as a short-term sedative and anxiolytic for cats and dogs, sometimes used as an appetite stimulant. It can also be used to stop seizures in dogs and cats.

Letter
Valium Saved My Life
Published: October 5, 2012

To the Editor:

Re “Valium’s Contribution to Our New Normal,” by Robin Marantz Henig (Sunday Review, Sept. 30):

After serving in the Army in Vietnam and suffering from what is now called post-traumatic stress disorder, I found that Librium, and then Valium, definitely saved my life.

Whatever negatives there may be about the use and overuse of Valium, it has saved many lives and improved the quality of millions of lives.

Its positives dramatically outweigh its negatives, and right now, there is really no adequate substitute for the psychoactive drugs.

MICHAEL J. GORMAN
Whitestone, Queens, Sept. 30, 2012

NT LOOKS AT JON

OMG…LOL 500 Z….who cares about Jon’s short list.

Jon is the proverbial criminal, weakling and sloth. Most criminals cry misunderstanding and innocence and use any kind of organized system to further their sociopathic delusions of grandeur.

Jon wanted to be the big man on benzowithdrawal. Jon posted pictures of himself with people he felt were influential. Nobody knows, to this day, who they are. Jon posts in bold and claims it’s because he doesn’t see well so he can direct attention toward himself. Old people like Jon need reading glasses. Jon is a pathological liar.

Jon took drugs and drank as a young child. He liked it and boasts about it. His brain has been ruined by his constant compulsion to self-medicate and get loaded. Jon is a criminal alcoholic/addict who likes to drink. Jon also smokes marijuana and takes opiates on a consistent basis but never speaks about it in his posts because he is secretly afraid of rejection or persecution. This is why Jon always tries to make himself into a big man. Jon wants command and control over things like benzowithdrawal.com.  Jon also thrives on having some type of sinister control over other people, particularly women. He cannot stand if someone else is getting more attention than he is and will connive in any underhanded way to achieve his imaginary status. Jon has always hated M59 because M59 is  charismatic and intelligent. Jon fought hard to push M59 off of the forum so he could reclaim his imaginary status. Jon was so busy planning M59’s demise that he didn’t realize it would backfire on him like it did.

Jon boasts about the many relationships he’s had with women on benzowithdrawal.com.  Jon accuses people of being predators. Jon has a severe case of psychological transference.

Most people can’t stand Jon. Jon’s children can’t stand him. Jon embarrasses his children so they ask him to stay away.

Jon will use you and lie to your face with the guise of someone who cares and one you can count on when the going gets tough. Jon has no conscience and will turn on you at the drop of a hat.

Jon sells drugs to benzowithdrawal.com members and then threatens to expose them for their addictions and secrets if he decides he doesn’t care for their behavior. He will threaten you both privately and publicly as well as try to threaten and expose you at his whim. Before he even engages in a transaction or conversation with you he will have thought it out as to what he will be able to use against you in the future should the need arise.

Jon has Napoleon complex:

Napoleon complex is an informal term describing an alleged type of inferiority complex which is said to affect some people, especially men, who are short in stature. The term is also used more generally to describe people who are driven by a perceived handicap to overcompensate in other aspects of their lives. Other names for the term include “Napoleon syndrome” and “Short Man syndrome”.

Urban Dictionary says:  napoleon complex – A personality complex that consists of power trips and false machismo to make up for short height and feelings of inferiority.

Jon has short lists because he is probably short just like Napoleon and George Costanza.

If you have a secret don’t tell it to Jon. He is dangerous and takes sadistic pleasure in exposing you and witnessing your social withdrawal.

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