Wonder if this L. Ron Hubbard lover was going to introduce anti-benzo legislation?

Benzo Buddies a target of anti-Scientology hackers?

Another Top Psychiatric Medication Info Site Went Down
« on: April 23, 2016, 04:11:52 am »

[Buddie]

I won’t give the name of the site because it is pretty much pro-psychiatric medications (that should give you enough of a hint as to what it was) but their forum went down with over 200,000 posts and 11,000 members being lost. They are not able to recover the forum to it’s original status. This reminds me of what happened to PP except they wanted to shut their doors forever. Now with only BB and SA left as the top psychiatric medication withdrawal sites, I’m worried about what would happen to BB if faced with a similar situation where the forum database became corrupted. I hope you guys are keeping a ton of verified backups!

Abusive End Psychiatry admin lashes out at woman who benefited from ECT

Melissa Ortega: “ECT is a last-ditch effort at stabilizing profoundly depressed individuals. These are people who tend to have suicidal ideation and for whom other therapies have failed. Studies–that can be replicated, which means they are SCIENCE and not fear-and-ignorance-based anecdotes–show that ECT is extremely effective for these patients. Stop sensationalizing medicine. Unless you know what you’re talking about, and it’s apparent that you don’t, stfu and stop stigmatizing people who could benefit IMMENSELY from this treatment.”

Susan Wales: “I find it interesting how Daniel claims to be an advocate for misdiagnosed and ill informed people, which is a good and noble stance, yet can so viciously attack another human being in such a hateful and evil way – which completely negates the thoughtful humanitarian he is trying to present himself as being. Sharing one’s own thankfully positive outcome is in no way a statement on or advocacy for any other person’s experience. Attacking a fragile person who struggled mightily for her own survival is vile and frankly, an evil and merciless act.
I truly hope not one more person respond to this vitriolic hateful person.”

Daniel Carter: “I’ve personally watched hundreds destroyed by psychiatry, many of whom are dead.
You’re spitting on their graves and you should be ashamed.
Don’t try to oppress my form of expression and protest against TORTURE. Fuck tradition. Fuck oppressive psychiatry and fuck anyone who thinks only of their own happiness and is incapable of considering what it would be like to be force treated unnecessarily.”

ChaCha Lambert: “Daniel Carter you are a misogynist asshole”

Izzy Swank: “It’s sad, it’s really fucking sad, that you have no empathy for the people struggling with mental health disorders so bad that they need follow through with such extreme treatments.
I, too, wasn’t an advocate for ECT for the longest time. Watching how depressive disorders can destroy people’s ability to function first hand really changed my mind though. And you know what? Despite the lack of research and negative side effects, it appears that it worked for someone closet to me in my life, and for that I am BEYOND thankful.
Quite frankly, I think you should go fuck yourself.

Narcissa N David Dyste: “I think Daniel does have some other issues going on though…he lashes out even when people aren’t arguing with him…”

Daniel Carter:I may be an asshole at times, but I do it for a good reason and at least I can admit it, Aimee. Forced psychiatry is nothing short of criminal and you seem to have a conflict of interest when it comes to your happiness and advocacy, at the expense of VICTIMS of torture. That’s if you even care.”

https://www.facebook.com/TheMindUnleashed/posts/1153337631390047?fref=nf

Stop Scientology Disconnection

What is Scientology Disconnection?

Disconnection is the severance of all ties between a Scientologist and a friend, colleague, or family member deemed to be antagonistic towards Scientology.

http://stopscientologydisconnection.com

HAIL XENU!

Health budget cuts helped create pro-Scientology anti-psychiatry sites

In the past, the mentally ill could count on mental health help from the government. That help, in the form of financial aid for state and local governments, provided both inpatient and outpatient services for the afflicted. Sadly, that is no longer the case today. Due to severe budget cuts, patients have been tossed – often literally – into the street and left to fend for themselves.
In part, these budget cuts allowed the mushrooming of so-called self-help sites like Benzo Buddies. Computers being reasonably cheap, the Internet became the new asylum for the untreated mentally ill. There was one caveat – there were no doctors running these sites. It truly was, and is, a case of the lunatics running the asylum.
It would not surprise me to find out that embittered benzo forum owners were once psychiatric ward patients forced them into the street by budget cuts. That would go a long way to explaining their hatred of psychiatry and their radicalization. 
State Budget Cuts Slash Mental Health Funding
Source: PBS NewsHour January 2011

Over the past ten days, the story of 22-year-old Jared Loughner, the alleged gunman in the Tucson shootings, has unfolded on news outlets throughout the world. It’s a dark tale of a troubled young man who was growing increasingly out of control — yet it seems neither he nor members of his family realized he needed treatment from mental health professionals.

Until two years ago, there were a number of programs in his community that would have been available to Loughner and his family if they had sought help. Like many places around the country, Pima County had mental health programs for people through both Medicaid and at community health centers. But now those programs have been cut because the state of Arizona is wrestling with a massive budget deficit.

Arizona has long offered mental health services, such as case workers and prescription drug coverage, to residents who don’t qualify for Medicaid, but also don’t have private insurance that covers mental health services. But since 2008, the state has had to slash a whopping $65 million from that program, affecting as many as 28,000 people last year.

Who are they? Mostly residents who’ve been mentally stable for years, being treated with prescription drugs, counseling and group therapy through programs in the area. Now, thousands of patients have lost their case workers, their doctors and access to group therapy, and many have been forced to take generic medications because the state no longer pays for most brand name drugs.

Bill Kennard, executive director of the Arizona chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, said the dramatic change in drug policy meant the formula went from whatever worked to an all-generic formula. So, Kennard said, a patient who finds that a more expensive drug works better for them now has pay for it himself, or switch to a generic drug.

Arizona is not the only place facing massive cuts to mental health services. Across the country, public programs for the mentally ill are on the chopping block because of huge state budget deficits.

Most of those affected by these new cuts are on Medicaid or indigent – and are persons with serious or persistent mental illness, according to Dr. Laurence Miller, who heads the American Psychiatric Association’s Committee on Public and Community Psychiatry.

Miller says nine states have closed down some public psychiatric units and substance abuse programs to save money, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Indiana. Mississippi closed 184 beds at its state hospital.

Funding mental health services has always been a challenge in statehouses across the country, Miller says. The lack of an advocating constituency and stigma, he says, are the root of the problem.

And although Medicaid spending in the states has risen, states all over the country have actually cut some Medicaid benefits. But they’re targeted – the new federal health care reform law and the economic stimulus legislation won’t let states cut eligibility requirements without losing federal funding. That means they’re cutting benefits wherever they can, including mental health.

But some analysts say that cutting mental health services now will eventually cost cities and states money, as more people who’ve been cut from these programs become unstable and find themselves in conflict with law enforcement.

In San Francisco, Dr. John Rouse, a psychiatrist at San Francisco General Hospital told The Examiner that “[i]t means more people in jail, it means more people pushing shopping carts down Market Street, it means more wasted resources because it makes it hard to intervene early and cheaply.”

The major provisions of the federal health care reform law are scheduled to take effect in 2014. If left intact, they’ll help solve some of these state budget problems, at least temporarily, as millions of Americans who cannot get mental health coverage through insurance or state programs today will have access to both under the law, and almost all of funding for the expansion of Medicaid will come from Washington for the first few years of implementation.

Between now and then, however, there is a rough road ahead for the nation’s poor — who also happen to be mentally ill.

Documentation

Between 2009 and 2012, states cut a total of $4.35 billion in public mental-health spending from their budgets. According to a report by the National Alliance on Mental Illness, significant cuts to general fund appropriations for state mental health agencies have translated into a severe shortage of services, including housing, community-based treatment and access to psychiatric medications. “Increasingly, emergency rooms, homeless shelters and jails are struggling with the effects of people falling through the cracks,” the report says, “due to lack of needed mental health services and supports.”

The map below shows how states’ spending changed on mental health services between 2009 and 2012. Click on a state to see the specifics.

MAP: Which States Have Cut Treatment For the Mentally Ill the Most?

Watch: Ghosts of the Asylums

Mother Jones’ cover story for May/June 2013, “Schizophrenic. Killer. My Cousin.”, features a collection of eerie, yet beautiful photographs of abandoned mental hospitals. They’re the work of Jeremy Harris, a Brooklyn photographer who began sneaking into these buildings in 2005. In this video Jeremy explains the project and shows off some of the hospital artifacts he’s collected along the way.