CULT TALK

I’ve been informed that some of the kooks are filing their FDA complaints multiple times. I’ve taken the liberty to forward the links, of cult members bragging they’ve filed more than once, to the FDA. No need to thank me. 🙂

IN PRAISE OF VALIUM

Medical uses

Diazepam tablets (2, 5, and 10 mg)

Diazepam is mainly used to treat anxiety, insomnia, panic attacks and symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal. It is also used as a premedication for inducing sedation, anxiolysis, or amnesia before certain medical procedures (e.g., endoscopy).[11][12] Diazepam is the drug of choice for treating benzodiazepine dependence with its long half-life allowing easier dose reduction. Benzodiazepines have a relatively low toxicity in overdose.[7]

Diazepam has a number of uses including:

Dosages should be determined on an individual basis, depending on the condition being treated, severity of symptoms, patient body weight, and any other conditions the person may have.[18]

Seizures

Intravenous diazepam or lorazepam are first-line treatments for status epilepticus.[7][20] However, intravenous lorazepam has advantages over intravenous diazepam, including a higher rate of terminating seizures and a more prolonged anticonvulsant effect. Diazepam gel was better than placebo gel in reducing the risk of non-cessation of seizures.[21] Diazepam is rarely used for the long-term treatment of epilepsy because tolerance to its anticonvulsant effects usually develops within six to 12 months of treatment, effectively rendering it useless for that purpose.[18][22]

The anticonvulsant effects of diazepam can help in the treatment of seizures due to a drug overdose or chemical toxicity as a result of exposure to sarin, VX, or soman (or other organophosphatepoisons), lindane, chloroquine, physostigmine, or pyrethroids.[18][23]

It is sometimes used intermittently for the prevention of febrile seizures that may occur in children under five years of age.[7] This use, however, is not typically recommended as the benefits are small and side effects are common.[24] Long-term use of diazepam for the management of epilepsy is not recommended; however, a subgroup of individuals with treatment-resistant epilepsy benefit from long-term benzodiazepines, and for such individuals, clorazepate has been recommended due to its slower onset of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effects.[7]

Other

Diazepam is used for the emergency treatment of eclampsia, when IV magnesium sulfate and blood-pressure control measures have failed.[25][26] Benzodiazepines do not have any pain-relieving properties themselves, and are generally recommended to avoid in individuals with pain.[27] However, benzodiazepines such as diazepam can be used for their muscle-relaxant properties to alleviate pain caused by muscle spasms and various dystonias, including blepharospasm.[28][29] Tolerance often develops to the muscle relaxant effects of benzodiazepines such as diazepam.[30]Baclofen[31] or tizanidine is sometimes used as an alternative to diazepam.

Availability

Diazepam is marketed in over 500 brands throughout the world.[32] It is supplied in oral, injectable, inhalation, and rectal forms.[18][33][34]

The United States military employs a specialized diazepam preparation known as Convulsive Antidote, Nerve Agent (CANA), which contains diazepam. One CANA kit is typically issued to service members, along with three Mark I NAAK kits, when operating in circumstances where chemical weapons in the form of nerve agents are considered a potential hazard. Both of these kits deliver drugs using autoinjectors. They are intended for use in “buddy aid” or “self aid” administration of the drugs in the field prior to decontamination and delivery of the patient to definitive medical care.[35]

FAN MAIL

From: John F
To: Cesspool of Madness

Fuck all you retarded idiots. You are the most ignorant group of people I have ever come across on planet earth. Psychiatrists kill and destroy million lifes every year.

Pharmaceutical companies are billion dollar industries. WAKE THE FUCK UP!

I would be more than happy to do therapy sessions via Skype

Therapy via Skype?
« on: December 31, 2016, 05:00:58 am »

[Buddie]

This is just a shot in the dark but I was wondering if anyone knew of any therapists or services that offer therapy sessions via Skype. During my taper I’ve developed agoraphobia because of constant depersonalization and as a result I’ve gotten in the habit of cancelling appointments at the last minute. I don’t know why insurance doesn’t cover appointment s via Skype or even by phone but they don’t.

I have Claire Weekes’ book on agoraphobia and I should read it again but with the cog fog that is difficult.

Site mascot Sicko Flicko became a benzo legend after his testicle was shot off during drug deal gone bad

Re: Tofu 'may raise risk of dementia'
« Reply #46 on: September 20, 2010, 09:06:54 PM »

mike59

flick tell us about when your testicle was shot off after surfing . that’s more entertaining

Re: Tofu 'may raise risk of dementia'
« Reply #47 on: September 20, 2010, 09:12:47 PM »

Flick

Mike always falls back on ridiculous lies when he has nowhere to go, I had one testicle injured falling on my board in a surfing accident and had surgery to repair it. was very painful, but only a piece of it was removed. like I said, the troll will try to bury anything really informative or interesting by posting a series of inane posts. i guess i will have to keep pasting that article for awhile in case someone with half brain wants to read it and learn some interesting things. If you feel like you are a drug addict, then speak for yourself. Flick

THIS TOO SHALL PASS

A Dialogue With Baylissa

“Please don’t let Mike59 freak you out. He struggles with a deeply emotionally disturbed and scared ‘vulnerable child within’ (wow… how is that for a diagnosis? 🙂 Damn I’m good (I say humbly)… Teehee.”

Who are you to diagnose me with anything? I’m not struggling with anything.

“He is a cyberbully and stalker which means he is a coward.”

Calling me a stalker smacks of libel to me. I am not stalking, nor have I ever stalked, anyone.

“Let a Chuck Norris type/look-alike write something and see if he will put it on his site.”

Find your “Chuck Norris type” and I will gladly accommodate you. This statement of yours comes off as a sick fantasy of me being beaten to a pulp. Are you okay? You don’t sound okay.

“Years ago I was concerned about what he used to put on his page, (mainly because it made so many people upset), and I eventually had them removed.”

I’ve never removed, at your request, anything about you from this site. There has never been a single request from you to remove one pixel of content – not one pixel. You’re lying to your followers.

“I have successfully sued the Daily Mail for defamation – something all the lawyers I contacted said was one of the most difficult things to do, some said impossible – so much so that people just allow them to get away with it.”

You’re not going to intimidate me. I have the right of free speech and that right is protected under U.S. law – the highest U.S. law – the Constitution. If you, or anyone else, feels I’ve libeled them please hire an attorney and take me to court. I welcome it.

Ex-Benzo Buddies moderator: 20k laboratory microgram scales worse than useless, members being harmed by brainwashing

This is from the valium taper thread, and it kind of proves that microtapering with inaccurate jewellers scales is totally pointless & unreliable if one wants a stable withdrawal. However, it’s still heavily marketed on benzobuddies as a perfectly valid and acceptable method to keep tapering and many [believers] members (including team members) swear that they can detect a 0.125mg dose reduction.
That’s nonsense as valium has a very long half-life and the body can’t detect such changes in a day (there is such a thing in pharmacology called a ‘threshold dose’.. you just never hear that on benzobuddies), and even if it could the methods they’re using are so unreliable there’s no way anyone’s measuring accurately in micrograms, and even if they were using $20,000 laboratory microgram scales, the drug itself has a -20/+25% tolerance?
It’s garbage that keeps people in fear and tapering for years when they could quit benzos in less than 3 months. They also advise long tapers from thienodiazepines which are designed with a significantly safer withdrawal profile and are far less addictive than traditional benzos. That’s funny because they don’t even know what they are on benzobuddies.
Good job a thoughtful ex mod created an RC benzo sticky for them while being attacked left, right & center at a time he was simultaneously suicidal, poly-withdrawing, recovering from a heart attack, grieving the loss of his brother and being severely harassed on & off the forum by the clique that are defended by the admins there, eh.
But never mind science, or facts, eh. Let’s just keep spreading nonsense and keep enabling mentally ill people to stay mentally ill and refuse proper treatment from those evil doctors.
A few posts up it was labelled by other buddies as a “tolerance myth spread on the boards” and then dismissed.. so I wonder how well that member who found the data will be treated hence forth. Not well I can imagine, going on my past experiences.
Yeah, real supportive environment there, all admin-approved, too, unless they don’t like you for shining light on their unsafe jewellers-scale microtapers, in which case you’re targeted in the same way Scientologists target their opponents!
No surprise there, though.
Ahem.
Re: VALIUM/DIAZEPAM SUPPORT GROUP
« Reply #17660 on: May 31, 2016, 04:23:48 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on May 31, 2016, 04:17:55 pm
So I guess this means they are supposed to have exactly 10 mg. of diazapam in each tablet if that is the dosage. I would think it could be off by a miniscule amount per manufacturing but to be off 20 % of a prescribed dosage would be scary. Thanks for posting this.
My pleasure. I’ve also read about the 20% “myth” on these boards. And you’re right it would be really nasty for us, but for those using generics for a heart condition or something of a similar ilk, it could be deadly.

Tufts Medical Center psychiatrist Dr. Edward Silberman: “Benzos safer than aspirin”

Abuse may be obscuring other dangers

The war against the opioid epidemic in Massachusetts may be pushing another potential public health crisis into the shadows.

According to research by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, benzodiazepines – a class of anti-anxiety and insomnia drugs, such as Ativan, Klonopin and Xanax – were involved in 31 percent of all opioid-related overdose deaths in 2014.

Benzos, the shorthand name for the drug class, relieve anxiety by slowing the central nervous system. Opioids work on the brain and nervous system in the same way. The combination of the two can severely depress respiratory activity, with life threatening consequences. CDC data from 1999 through 2014 shows that overdose deaths due to benzos has increased 600 percent from 1,135 people in 1999 to 7,945 people in 2014.

An analysis of the CDC data by Dr. Marcus Bachhuber for the American Journal for Public Health, found that between 1996 and 2013, the number of adults filling a benzodiazepine prescriptions increased 67 percent, from 8.1 million to 13.5 million people. And, among people who filled benzo prescriptions, the amount more than doubled between 1996 and 2013, suggesting higher doses per patient. The study also showed that benzo-related deaths rose at a faster rate than both the number of people filling prescriptions or the quantity filled.

State Rep. Paul McMurtry, D-Dedham, has proposed a bill to limit and regulate benzodiazepine prescriptions. A hearing on the proposal held at the Statehouse in April, which included emotional testimony from addicts, survivors and healthcare providers. The bill was sent back to committee on study order and could remain there for months. Fall River Rep. Carole Fiola, who co-sponsored the bill, says the state should be doing more to regulate the drugs. “Massachusetts has always been a leader in many areas of legislation, and we are bringing up a conversation that is important to a lot of people,” Fiola said. “That’s our role and we will continue to gather the facts and research this over the next several months, and see what comes from that.”

Opponents say the threat from benzos is overblown.

Tufts Medical Center psychiatrist Dr. Edward Silberman, who testified against the bill, said benzos are a relatively safe drug. Unless a patient suffers from addiction to other substances as well, benzos can’t do much harm, he said. “These medications, taken alone, are amongst the safest medications that doctors prescribe,” Silberman said. “They’re safer than aspirin. It’s practically impossible to kill yourself by overdosing on benzodiazepines.”

However, Dr. Richard D. Lewis, who has worked in a New Bedford mental health clinic for 20 years, says doctors need to understand the deadly interaction between benzos and opiates. He maintains a blog for an addiction website called Mad in America, where recent post focuses on the deadly mix. “I think this crisis is going pretty much unnoticed,” Lewis said. “I would argue that you can’t solve or make a dent into the opiate crisis without addressing the benzo issue. Lewis says opioid addicts often are given Suboxone or Methadone, which are opiates, themselves. These individuals will, Lewis says, experience anxiety or trouble sleeping, often leading doctors to prescribe benzos. And that, Lewis says, can contribute to opioid overdoses because of the negative interactions of the two drugs. “Benzos and opiates will kill you,” Lewis said. “It’s the synergistic effect of one plus one becomes five.”

Statistics on benzo-related deaths in Massachusetts are hard to come by. Most of the focus by pathologists has been on calculating and tracking opioid deaths. According to Felix Browne, a spokesman for the state Office of Public Safety, statistics for overdose deaths can be misleading. He said cause of death is pulled from death certificates, which can be hastily done. Any conclusive determination in final autopsy reports require a full toxicology screening that can cost upwards of $2,500. The state Medical Examiner’s Office usually doesn’t do such screenings unless there are suspicious circumstances or the family requests it and pays the cost. Final autopsy reports can take from a few months to a few years, due to backlog in cases. Until completed, there’s no way of knowing how much of each drug was in the victim’s system at the time of death.

“The Medical Examiner’s Office has their own way of operating that is very little understood.” Browne said. “Survivors just want to know how their loved one died so they can move on. That’s what the death certificate is for. It’ll say something like ‘acute intoxication’ or ‘cardiac arrest,’ but it’s often more than one substance that’s involved. They don’t know until the full autopsy report is filed.”

For now, it is unlikely any action will be taken on benzos.

Fiola says she hopes the bill will be reconsidered next session. But, Silberman says legislation isn’t the answer. “It’s really very difficult to legislate good medical practice. It’s a little bit like trying to legislate morality. You can have an impact, but it’s using a very broad brush to deal with a problem,” Silberman said. “In medicine, one should think about the individual patient, and one size doesn’t necessarily fit all.”