FEAR OF BACON

Bacon
« on: September 14, 2017, 01:08:16 pm »

[Buddie]

Anyone have any trouble with bacon when in pretty accute state? I really need to eat a piece of bacon… Please, any opinions good or bad.

Re: Bacon
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2017, 05:19:45 pm »

[Buddie]

I understand your query. True – I don’t have any problems now, but i’m 3.7 years out. When I was in acute, milk products kind of gave me loose stool (not quite diarrhea). I had a fair bit of reflux and a little bloating. It wasn’t terrible, but I did have some minor GI issues/food sensitivities. I could pretty easily treat those ‘issues’ (e.g. with OTC antacids) or I could just ignore them (e.g. loose stool). I only dropped one ‘food’ (an artificial sweetener that seemed to give me hot flashes followed by night sweats). But it’s true – GI issues weren’t as big a withdrawal symptom for me compared with some of the other symptoms (insomnia had to be my most debilitating symptom). Perhaps others will chime in about bacon.

Re: Bacon
« Reply #23 on: September 17, 2017, 04:41:39 pm »

[Buddie]

There is uncured and no nitrate bacon.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2017, 12:50:24 am by [Buddie] »

Re: Bacon
« Reply #29 on: September 18, 2017, 06:07:37 am »

[Buddie]

Guys slightly off topic, but I added coconut oil to my diet yesterday (and i am going to create a new thread for this). Now it did not seem to rev me up, that is I did not 30 mins later suddenly start panicking, or tiwtching or anything like that BUT it kind of made me extremely mellow… EXTREMELY, as if I just hit a fat green weed flavoured pegasus bong. Following this I have never felt so chilled, not in 5 weeks, sleepy and chilled and well calm… NOW im no scientist and I should probably be thankfull but im worried AF now. How cna that be. Does coconut oil mess with your GABA receptors? I think its good to have fats like coconut oil in your brain right for nerve healing, but whats up with that effect? Would you all be worried? IS coconut oil one of those foods that we should be avoiding like certain herbs that people avoid which interact with GABA? Any feelings on this? then we can go back to the bacon.

Re: Bacon
« Reply #35 on: September 18, 2017, 11:54:25 am »

[Buddie]

new girl do you weigh 42 kg’s? eish…. I may have some other issues rolled in though. doctors are sending me for MS screening. I am fine most days then out of the blue I get hit with these head symptoms, I become instantly dumb, feels like there is a block in the left side of my face, struggle to think and concentrate, get deeply detached and hazy. Very scary. I am hoping that is not he case. I was free of this best for 10 months, and then I took like 55 times the amount of vitmain b complex that a normal human should take per day for 3 days and suddenly anxiety started, then physical symptoms and now full on cognitive symptoms. So my problems are pretty huge right now. I dont know if this think is a benzo relapse, some kind of permanent damage from the high number of multivitamins I took (which in hindsight I have learned can actually do nerve damage) or some sort of MS attack. Very scary. I am HOPING like hell it is a just a benzo fall back and not MS or the multiple types of complications that vitamin hypertoxicity can cause. Its pretty scary. I’m pretty chilled by its a scary place. the fact that symptoms come and go tell me its very possibly a benzo wave. But it has lasted 5 weeks now with very little improvement if any. At least on the mental side. I think that I have just generally damaged my nervous system at this point, who knows.

Re: Bacon
« Reply #36 on: September 18, 2017, 12:40:43 pm »

[Buddie]

Oh, […], I’m so sorry to hear you have these terrible symptoms, must be really tough! 

It’s good that you are seeing some doctors about this, even if they don’t find anything, it’s better to be reassured. I don’t have much experience with PAWS, as I am still tapering, so I don’t have much advice here, maybe you could also post in the Post-withdrawal support thread about this?

Just out of curiosity, if you don’t mind sharing, what did you take the vitamin b complex for? And how did you manage to obtain such a high dose?

Big hugs and all my strengths to you!!! I hope you’ll get soon over this!

Re: Bacon
« Reply #37 on: September 18, 2017, 12:58:29 pm »

[Buddie]

NewGirl,

I’m a complete idiot. it was a collection of vitamins that I had built up over probably the space of a year and a half. I got a mild headache and thought hey maybe I will just give myself a vitamin BOOST and that will clear it up. it was 6 different bottles. 3 were B-complexes, one was a Maxi-B, one was an iron and folate (which also had B vits), and the other 2 were multivitamins. All had B-complexes all of them basically. I had been healed for o long that withdrawal was no longer a part of my life, I was healed 100 percent. I never even thought ” hey this could trigger me” thats how war out and healed I was. I took all 6 pills each day for a few days, I might have even doubled up on one day. Im so embarrassed even typing this actually, its like i potentially threw my life away. the damage seems permanent and I seem VERY sensitive to foods, I think high vitamin b-6 foods. So i eat no meat. I am eating enough in my opinion to maintain my weight but alas it still drops at least 250 grams a day… SO in short, my issues may not even be benzo related, I may have simply poisoned my nervous system (potentially fatally), especially if I cant eat meat. Im basically holding on, hoping my weight doesnt drop to levels where they have to hospitalize as this would lead to medicating by doctors who dont understand benzo withdrawal let alone vitmain hypertoxicity. so I want to avoid that. You see, im not sure if this is maybe a benzo setback, GOD i hope it is NewGirl. then I know i have hope. If it is poisoning then I dont think I see the year out. Which I have made peace with actually. Its just my kids that worry me… My heart is breaking for my kids, one is 4 and the other is 4 months. All I can do is hold on. its so complicated, what if i get diagnosed with MS but it isnt MS and they treat me and it aggravates my potential benzo withdrawal further. What if it really is MS and they medicate me with steroids or something that I would obviously need but that is not compatible with my benzo history? Do I then live my whole life in withdrawal due to the medication that I need to live continuously triggering withdrawal? Its a complete mess. OR it is vitamin hyper toxicity and the doctors hospitalize me and pump me FULL of nutrients to help me pick up weight, including more B-vits thus doing more damage. SO Ja, I went from being in the absolute best position ever, healed from benzo withdrawal after just a month and a half (maybe 2 months) to basically the worst position that a mortal person could be in. I basically check mated myself. Apologies for the long respond and for killing the fun nature of the post.

And dont worry, surprisingly my mind is in the right place regardless of all of this, I am getting used to it. the thing that makes me worry that its not withdrawal but more just some kind of permanent toxicity damage to the nervous system is that it has reached a point where it just isnt improving at all. Im hoping something just happens and it begins to lift or fade with time, like the nerve damage can magically heal over time. But in the mean time im not sure what to eat and what to avoid so as to fascilitate this repair. Real tough. I live with a lot of powerful anxiety which is not in the mind but in the nervous system, if you have withdrawn from benzos then you know what that feels like, I have detachment, fear, pain in limbs, tired limbs. So unbelievable, and I was a new man, healed, new house, new kid, beautiful wife. All pretty much on its way out. Tough one.

Apologies again 

Benzo Buddies-induced food phobias burn out of control

Fatigue after eating
« on: January 31, 2016, 02:03:21 pm »

[Buddie]

I saw a post about this but it was dated more than a couple of years ago so I decided to post a new one.

This past week I’ve noticed that I suddenly feel exhausted and weak right after I have my dinner. I can barely drag myself to bed I feel so tired and groggy. It does eases up in a couple of hours and it’s not so bad during the day. Anyone else experience this? Anything that might help?
« Last Edit: January 31, 2016, 02:25:36 pm by [Buddie] »

Re: Fatigue after eating
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2016, 06:33:13 pm »

[Buddie]

Could it be what you are eating or does it happen no matter what you eat? It could be your body working hard to digest. I notice symptoms with eating as well…..sometimes I feel more revved up and feel a strange tremor or vibration through my body.

Re: Fatigue after eating
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2016, 06:59:04 pm »

[Buddie]

Eating and digestion are a huge tax on the body. Many people, including myself, report an increase in all kinds of symptoms due to eating. All part of the deal. I try to avoid putting stuff in my stomach as much as I can, cause it really revs me up .

SCIENCE VS. CULT FEAR OF BUTTER

Re: Banned for spamming too many kitty pics
« Reply #219 on: July 18, 2012, 12:51:57 AM »

Colin

Quote from: wharfrat666 on July 15, 2012, 04:32:18 AM
but when someone is afraid of mayonnaise or butter, that’s an issue that should not be encouraged. Shame on you and your cohorts for not stifling such.

Why don’t you do your own research instead of just swallowing the crap from your friend. Though, frankly, I think you know the content posted at the blog is nonsense. The ‘butter’ stuff was at the benzowithdrawal.com forum (not BenzoBuddies), and as it was explained to me, like the vast majority of the stolen content appearing at the abusive blog, it was totally misrepresented. My experience is that 99% of the content there lies somewhere between deliberate misrepresentation, and damn lies.

The only mayonnaise stuff of which I am aware (and blogged about at the abusive blog) is a recent comment from a BB member stating that they prefer full-fat mayo over half-fat because off all the additional crap they put in the half-fat version. They just felt that, ‘on balance, a modest amount of full-fat mayo was a healthier option’. In what world should they be disciplined for such a statement? It is you and your friend that are the control freaks, not I, not the team here at BB. You!

Even if from time-to-time members should post something about an irrational fear, why is this a reason for them to be vilified, humiliated, and targeted? Why is it of any surprise that some people (particularly at a support forum where many members suffer from anxiety disorders) post about their anxieties and phobias? WharfRat: get – a – grip! Stop believing everything you read at your friend’s blog – read the original material – read it context – and if you still don’t like it: consider that the person posting it probably doesn’t deserve to be abused, have their words distorted, their visage superimposed upon a dog, their personal details published, or receive crank calls from a crank.

How food marketers made butter the enemy

James McWilliams—a historian who has made a name for himself in prestigious publications like the New York Times and The Atlantic for his contrarian defenses of the food industry—is back at it. In an item published last week in the excellent Pacific Standard, McWilliams uses the controversy over a recent study of saturated fat as a club with which to pummel food industry critics like the Times’ Mark Bittman.

Here’s what happened: A group including Harvard and Cambridge researchers analyzed 72 studies and concluded that there’s no clear evidence that ditching saturated fat (the kind found mainly in butter, eggs, and meat) for the monounsaturated and polyunsaturated kind (found in fish and a variety of vegetable oils) delivers health benefits.

Bittman responded to the study’s release with a Times item declaring that “butter is back.” His real point was more nuanced than that, though. The study’s conclusion “doesn’t mean you [should] abandon fruit for beef and cheese,” he wrote. Rather, he urged, “you [should] just abandon fake food for real food, and in that category of real food you can include good meat and dairy.”

Not so fast, McWilliams countered. He pointed out, correctly, that the study turned out to have errors, which the authors had to correct. But even after the corrections, the study’s lead author stood by the overall findings, Science reported. Another one of the authors told Science that the study’s main problem was the way it was covered by media. “We are not saying the guidelines are wrong and people can eat as much saturated fat as they want,” he told Science. “We are saying that there is no strong support for the guidelines and we need more good trials.”

Of course, headline aside, Bittman didn’t fall into that trap. He merely urged his readers to accept some fat when they’re “looking for a few chunks of pork for a stew,” and to use real butter in place of “I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter.” Indeed, Bittman’s call for moderation in eating animal products is long-standing—he’s the author of a book called Vegan Before Six and a longtime champion of the “Meatless Mondays” practice.

But McWilliams’ real beef (so to speak) ultimately didn’t involve the study itself, or the debate over fat’s place in our diets. Rather, it centered on Bittman’s critique of the food industry, which Bittman blamed for stoking the public’s fat phobia, and manipulating to its own ends. McWilliams chides Bittman for the “disingenuousness of using a study on fat and heart health as grounds for condemning processed food,” and laments the “dubious manner in which processed foods are condemned.”

But he misses an important point: You can’t meaningfully debate the role of fat in our diets without looking hard at the way the food industry has manipulated the evolving scientific consensus around fat. On NPR last week, reporter Allison Aubrey showed how widespread fat phobia among the public gained traction from a 1977 decree by a US Senate committee that people should consume less saturated fat—which then got interpreted by the food industry as a license to promote sugar-laden, carbohydrate-rich products as “low fat” and thus healthy.

Simultaneously, as Bittman correctly noted, trans fats—cheap vegetable oils treated with hydrogen so that they remain solid at room temperature—emerged as the food industry’s butter substitute of choice for decades, providing the main substance for margarine. Based on relentless food industry marketing, generations of people grew up thinking trans-fat-laden margarine was healthier than butter—even after science definitively showed that it was much, much worse (a sorry tale I laid out here).

These fat-related marketing triumphs, quite profitable for the food industry, coincided with a surge in diet-related health troubles, including heightened obesity, diabetes, and metabolic-syndrome rates. Bittman is correct to discuss highly processed food in the context of the controversy over fat; and in trying to force it out of the conversation, McWilliams is playing his usual role: reasonable-sounding defender of a highly profitable but dysfunctional industry.

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