Benzo Buddies labeled draconian hell site, run by out of control moderators, filled with people who thrive on self-pity

June 06, 2019 8:27 AM EDT
I experienced the same thing on BenzoBuddies. At first it was a great forum and others on that forum helped me through the toughest times of my withdrawal. After I healed, I thought I would pay it forward. I was doing a good job helping others and then decided to introduce outside sources of hope and encouragement. I was instantly reprimanded and when I complained, they pretty much locked down my account to where I couldn’t post anything without moderator approval, nor could I Personal Message anyone. My account was for all intents and purposes…worthless and not usable. I told one moderator in particular that you need people on the site that healed to help and give hope to others. She dismissed it and said I thought I was “special” and “better than everyone else.” Because I volunteered my time on the site? Needless to say I don’t go on BBs any longer. Their draconian rules are only meant to stifle what they claim they are about, which is giving others hope. Too many rules, too many moderators on a power kick and too political…that’s how I would sum up BenzoBuddies. Plus too many hard core people that claim they never heal when they don’t tell “rest of the story.” Almost all of those cases involve being poly drugged and having preexisting medical conditions prior to any type of anti-psychotic drug use.
– Igotmylifeback

Klonopin for 10 days, Benzo Buddies for life

Re: HELP!! Do I need to taper?
« Reply #11 on: August 28, 2019, 07:04:41 pm »

RKO

Not trying to scare you but I was only on Klonopin for 10 days and my doctor wouldn’t allow me to do an Ashton taper because I was only on for such a short time.

I was hooked by day 7, unknowingly, when I took half a dose one night and woke up with heart palps. Damn pills nearly killed me when I quit after a rapid taper that was basically a CT.

It’s been over 15 months and I’m nowhere near healed.

I’ve come to realize, however, that I am in the extreme minority. You’ll probably be fine though.

Paxil: 2000-2007
2/08: Adverse reaction to 9 days of Saw Palmetto extract for hair loss (PFS)
Klonopin: .25mg PRN 2/08-7/08
Prozac: 11/08-3/09

Drug free for 9+ years, life was great

4/19: Severe ear infection, temporarily deaf, tinnitus – rx Augmentin

4/26-5/1: Steroid taper pack

4/26-5/5: Rx Klonopin .5mg nightly by ENT for insomnia/tinnitus (heart palps on Day 7 with .25mg, dependent in a week?!)
5/6: Cut to .25 mg (cut 1mg tabs into quarters) – BAD symptoms. Run to GP for help
5/10: Cut to .125mg (per GP advice) – even worse symptoms, bad advice from doc
5/13: Jumped. WAY TOO SOON. HELL. Should’ve reinstated, basically CT. Didn’t have sufficient supply, GP wouldn’t prescribe more. Wrongly assumed short use would be short WD

Cult forces dangerous taper on 76-year-old

Better late than never
« on: January 06, 2019, 05:50:17 pm »

[Buddie]

My name is […]. I am 76 years old. I have been taking 2 mg. of lorazepam nightly for 25 years. I tried two years ago to taper, got to 1 mg. and regressed back to 2 mg. I am doing direct taper, water suspension of 300 ml, drawing off at a rate of one ml daily. I began on January 1 so today I will draw off 6 ml. By day 75, I will be down to 1.5 mg lorazepam at which point I will reassess to make sure I stay within the 10% drop limit. These are early days but I really feel the need for support and identity with others going through this experience. Thank you for being here.

Re: Better late than never
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2019, 05:50:35 pm »

[Buddie]

Welcome to Benzo Buddies. we are a support and information group for those wanted to get off of benzodiazepines. Much congrats on what you have accomplished. I am very pleased that you are looking for camaraderie from here out. It is such a lifeline. Not only do we support each other, we have a wealth of sound information on everything from withdraw symptoms, how benzo’s affect the brain, and success stories.

Here are some helpful links on tapering:

http://www.benzo.org.uk/manual

http://www.benzobuddies.org/forum/index.php?board=56.0

http://www.benzobuddies.org/forum/index.php?board=145.0

In the forums pertinent to your circumstances, you will find other buddies going through their own tapers. This is a good place to ask questions, and receive guidance.

Again, welcome to Benzo Buddies, you have come to a safe, confidential informative support group, and we are happy to have you as a member. You can do this, with knowledge and finding coping skills.

Please take some time to Create a Signature. This will help other members understand your history so they will be better able to support you. Go to the top of the page and select Profile, then choose Forum Profile, insert drug history/timelines into the text box and click Change Profile.

We look forward to reading more from you over the forthcoming days and weeks.

Take care,

BB Team

WEDMAN ENTERS HELL

Wedman Withdrawal
« on: November 06, 2018, 12:01:28 am »

Wedman

I am joining BenzoBuddies because I am going through benzo withdrawal and want to learn more about what to expect. I was on temazepam for 5 years at 30mg at night for sleep. I started experiencing withdrawal about 3 months ago. I have been tapering and now on 7.5mg daily. I expect to finish my taper in 2 weeks. I am on trazadone and gabapentin.

Benzo Buddies orders terrified addict to ignore doctor, reject psychiatric medication

Hello, My Story
« on: August 17, 2018, 01:25:54 pm »

[Buddie]

Hi. I’m in a bad situation because I decided to smoke weed with friends about three months ago and only one hit threw me into a mood frenzy. I was an insomniac for a week after, non stop crying, paranoid, and panic attacks. So I managed to get 1mg Xanax from a friend which I used for about 14 days at night for sleep to reset my sleep. The last four days, I cut it to .5mg and then .25mg. I then stopped because I felt fine. However, I have been having up and down mood swings, palpitations that make me fear a heart attack, restlessness, shaking, paranoia, and what feels like chronic fatigue. I fear for my life like the weed may have cause tachycardia or mitral valve prolapse. Is this just from my underlying anxiety or the CT from the xanax? I got a shaky episode the other night and had to use one to stop the tremors and feel it was a bad idea. I see a psychiatrist Monday and I am terrified because I can’t tell the doctor about the weed or the xanax because the medicine was not prescribed to me and I could get in trouble. What do I do? I fear my life may never be the same again. I am weak and tremoring as I write this. What if I’m developing mental illness? The only option is for the psych to prescribe me benzos or ssris. I don’t want either.

Re: Hello, My Story
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2018, 01:37:37 pm »

[Buddie]

Hello […],

Welcome to Benzo Buddies! I’m sorry you had such a severe effect from marijuana. Some strains can in fact increase anxiety, it appears you might have experienced this. Additionally, there might have been other substances in the marijuana that cause your reaction.

You took xanax for about two weeks. The recommended length of time for taking benzos is a maximum of two to three weeks, so you are right in that time frame. You are most likely feeling the effects from stopping xanax. There is likely to be withdrawal effects of some kind after two weeks of use. I do believe that these symptoms should ease up though, it may take a little while though.

If it were me, I would explain to the doctor what started your issues. If you don’t explain the cause, it is likely that the doctor will diagnose you with an anxiety disorder. If you didn’t have issues like this before using marijuana, then the effects you felt were due to the weed.

Your central nervous system took a hit with the marijuana and xanax. It may take a little while for things to settle, but they will. Try to distract from what you feel so that the fear doesn’t cause more issues.

I’ll give you a link to the Ashton Manual. It is an excellent resource about benzos and how to withdraw. It was written by Dr. Heather Ashton, an expert in the field. The manual does discuss tapering in detail but IMO, I would not suggest this for you. If it were me, I’d stay away from benzos and allow my body to recover.

I’ll also give you a link to the Post Withdrawal Recovery Board where you can post and receive feedback from members.

Your life will be the same, once your system recovers. I know this can be frightening, I felt the same way when I was directed to stop ativan for a medical test. I’m glad you’ve joined, you’ll find a lot of good information and support here. It’s going to be OK.

The Ashton Manual

Post-withdrawal Recovery Support

[…]  :)

Re: Hello, My Story
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2018, 02:13:00 pm »

[Buddie]

Thanks. If my psych has to give me something, what would be the best route as I am terrified of those withdrawals as well?

Re: Hello, My Story
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2018, 06:29:15 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on August 17, 2018, 02:13:00 pm
Thanks. If my psych has to give me something, what would be the best route as I am terrified of those withdrawals as well?

You don’t have to take any medication if offered. It is your body and you can make the decision as to what to put in it. I didn’t even know what a benzo was when I was prescribed it. I had no idea about it’s potential for dependency or withdrawal. I learned a big lesson; be proactive about what I take and question everything.

It’s been my experience that ‘some’ doctors want to medicate everything when there are other alternatives.

[…] :smitten:

Re: Hello, My Story
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2018, 07:04:06 pm »

[Buddie]

Yeah. I also forgot to mention that three days before the weed incident, I CT’d beer completely and for the past year I was drinking three to four to five a day. Could that have something to do with what I am going through maybe?

People who joined Benzo Buddies not healed seven years later

Difficult topic - potential for trigger
« on: June 05, 2018, 05:36:07 pm »

[Buddie]

Why are there people still not healed 3,4,5,6,7+ years out? Is there a common theme to this?

I just don’t understand it when the “stats” show that everyone heals between 2-3 years at the latest from the studies that were done. More than that, how do these people who haven’t “healed” this far out manage to live? Are they now working or is someone supporting them financially? I just don’t get how people can simply exist with an illness like this without going completely nuts. Maybe I’m just a lightweight because I am just (and I mean just) getting through each day now at 19/20 months.

Re: Difficult topic - potential for trigger
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2018, 09:14:02 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on June 05, 2018, 05:36:07 pm
Why are there people still not healed 3,4,5,6,7+ years out? Is there a common theme to this?

I just don’t understand it when the “stats” show that everyone heals between 2-3 years at the latest from the studies that were done. More than that, how do these people who haven’t “healed” this far out manage to live? Are they now working or is someone supporting them financially? I just don’t get how people can simply exist with an illness like this without going completely nuts. Maybe I’m just a lightweight because I am just (and I mean just) getting through each day now at 19/20 months.

Hello […], I think there are many reasons why some of us are taking many years to recover. i am obviously one of them. It may be genetics, underlying health conditions, many complicating factors, sometimes it is very difficult to know. I am lucky, I am 63 and retired, I have a pension and I am okay financially. Not everyone is so fortunate. I am sure you are not a lightweight. For me, I got through it hour by hour, suffering was intolerable, but nevertheless, I got through it. I have very supportive friends but not much in the way of family support. BenzoBuddies was my lifeline for a very very long time. I used many different strategies to distract … as best as I could. But basically I existed ..

None of the stats we have are robust but I think we generally accept that most people will recover in a couple of years and a minority will take longer and a small minority will take even longer. It is important to remember that even when we take quite a number of years to recover we generally improve as I have done so although the first few years were hellish, that does not mean the next few years will also be hellish. I am still not recovered but I am not suffering .. that is all over. I am no longer existing but I am not living either .. but I can cope perfectly well now. Of course I would much rather be living a normal life.

So as much as you are suffering right now, it will get easier. It is extremely unusual for that not to happen. I only know a handful who seem to be getting worse and I have been around for a long time and that may be due to other health issues, I don’t know.

I have never been particularly well so I have had a whole lifetime of coping with illness and disability and that has probably helped me to cope, others will not have that experience to draw on if they have been used to good health.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 09:20:08 pm by [Buddie] »

Re: Difficult topic - potential for trigger
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2018, 10:17:11 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on June 05, 2018, 05:36:07 pm
Why are there people still not healed 3,4,5,6,7+ years out? Is there a common theme to this?

I just don’t understand it when the “stats” show that everyone heals between 2-3 years at the latest from the studies that were done.

I am not aware of any study that says that everyone heals within 2-3 years. MOST people certainly heal within that timeframe, but it Ashton herself is pretty clear that this isn’t the case for everyone.

Quote
More than that, how do these people who haven’t “healed” this far out manage to live? Are they now working or is someone supporting them financially?

I am 7 1/2 years off and have seen significant improvement in some symptoms, others not so much so. I was able to start a business when I was about 3 years off and I have recently moved back out on my own again. Every day is still a challenge but somehow I manage to hold it all together.

Quote
I just don’t get how people can simply exist with an illness like this without going completely nuts. Maybe I’m just a lightweight because I am just (and I mean just) getting through each day now at 19/20 months.

You aren’t a lightweight, you are just projecting. MOst people feel better and become more functional with time, so you will probably be better off in a few years.