Informed consent? Were the people who were sold these dangerous bath salts and synthetic marijuana informed of the health risks beforehand?

Informed consent is a process for getting permission before conducting a healthcare intervention on a person, or for disclosing personal information. A health care provider may ask a patient to consent to receive therapy before providing it, or a clinical researcher may ask a research participant before enrolling that person into a clinical trial. Informed consent is collected according to guidelines from the fields of medical ethics and research ethics.

An informed consent can be said to have been given based upon a clear appreciation and understanding of the facts, implications, and consequences of an action. Adequate informed consent is rooted in respecting a person’s dignity.[1] To give informed consent, the individual concerned must have adequate reasoning faculties and be in possession of all relevant facts. Impairments to reasoning and judgment that may prevent informed consent include basic intellectual or emotional immaturity, high levels of stress such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or a severe intellectual disability, severe mental disorder, intoxication, severe sleep deprivation, Alzheimer’s disease, or being in a coma.

Obtaining informed consent is not always required. If an individual is considered unable to give informed consent, another person is generally authorized to give consent on his behalf, e.g., parents or legal guardians of a child (though in this circumstance the child may be required to provide informed assent) and conservators for the mentally disordered, or consent can be assumed through the doctrine of implied consent, e.g., when an unconscious person will die without immediate medical treatment.

Benzo withdrawal community member sentenced to 46 months in prison for mail fraud, money laundering charges related to bath salts and synthetic marijuana trafficking ring

Cult member: Most Benzo Buddies members don’t exist!

The Members List
« on: November 16, 2018, 05:51:16 am »

[Buddie]

Has anyone really perused the “Members List” on this forum? It just seems to me that so very many have have zero posts. There are some that make a few yet just disappear. Thoughts?

Chris Cornell’s history of drug abuse swept under carpet by deranged Benzo Buddies kooks screaming justice

Chris Cornell’s Family Sues Psychiatrist over Ativan
« on: November 01, 2018, 09:30:25 pm »

[Buddie]

Justice
https://variety.com/2018/music/news/chris-cornell-widow-files-malpractice-suit-soundgarden-1203017603/

Admin might need to move this but not sure where it goes.

Re: Chris Cornell’s Family Sues Psychiatrist over Ativan
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2018, 09:46:27 pm »

[Buddie]

imo, attorneys sue where ever there is a chance for monetary settlement. cornell’s wife knew he was taking lorazepam, he told her on the phone shortly before his death that he had taken a few extra doses. why didn’t she/he take appropriate actions in regard to his addiction/drug seeking behavior before his death? the rx’s written to him (940 mg over 20 months) are about 1.5 mg/day, not an excessive dosage. the toxicology autopsy report indicated 4 mg lorazepam, barbiturates (where did he get these?), and other substances. yes, suicide ideation is a symptom associated with benzodiazepines but not any more so for cornell than for you or i. as i said imo, the attorney is seeking monetary settlement for a celebrity’s estate but, such action would likely not be brought by the estate of an average person.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2018, 10:46:35 pm by [Buddie] »

Re: Chris Cornell’s Family Sues Psychiatrist over Ativan
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2018, 09:58:01 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on November 01, 2018, 09:46:27 pm
imo, attorneys sue where ever there is a chance for monetary settlement. cornell’s wife knew he was taking lorazepam, he told her on the phone shortly before his death that he had taken a few extra doses. why didn’t she/he take appropriate actions in regard to his addiction/drug seeking behavior before his death? the rx’s written to him (980 mg over 20 months) are about 1.6 mg/day, not an excessive dosage. the toxicology autopsy report indicated 4 mg lorazepam, barbiturates (where did he get these?), and other substances. yes, suicide ideation is a symptom associated with benzodiazepines but not any more so for cornell than for you or i. as i said imo, the attorney is seeking monetary settlement for a celebrity’s estate but, such action would likely not be brought by the estate of an average person.
Can we please just enjoy the fact that someone is being held accountable and it’s making the news?

Re: Chris Cornell’s Family Sues Psychiatrist over Ativan
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2018, 10:00:49 pm »

[Buddie]

enjoy if you want, but it may make it more difficult for those that are still alive & depend upon benzodiazepines for what ever legitimate purposes they use them or may need them in the future. also, I believe they are suing cornell’s treating physician, a cardiologist, not a psychiatrist: Dr. Robert Koblin is a cardiologist in Beverly Hills, California.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2018, 10:39:47 pm by [Buddie] »

A short history of Cornell's drug abuse

Turnbridge

Chris Cornell had long struggled with drug abuse and addiction. He started using around age 12, and by the time he was 13-years-old, he had become a daily drug user – of pot, pills, or whatever was easily accessible at the time. When he was just 14, Chris Cornell had a bad experience with PCP (a dangerous hallucinogen) and wound up with a longer-lasting panic disorder – agoraphobia. For the two years following that experience, Cornell rarely talked to anyone and did not have any friends. He had debilitating flashbacks of his PCP trip and stayed home most of the time. He became depressed.

Though Cornell stayed away from hard drugs for years after that, he drank heavily from adolescence to his late thirties. He was the child of two alcoholics and felt his own drinking problem was nearly inevitable. In a 2006 interview with SPIN magazine, Cornell explained that it was alcohol that eventually led him back to drug abuse:

“I think alcohol is what leads you to everything, because it takes away the fear. The worst drug experimentation I ever did was because I was drunk and didn’t care.” By everything, Chris Cornell primarily meant prescription medications. When things got hard at home, he hit the bottle and took some pills, leading him to an even more severe state of depression and addiction.

Wikipedia

In a 2006 interview, Cornell revealed that at the age of 14, he had a bad PCP experience and suffered from panic disorder and agoraphobia. “I had a bad PCP [angel dust] experience when I was 14 and I got panic disorder. And of course, I wasn’t telling anyone the truth. It’s not like you go to your dad or your doctor and say, ‘Yeah, I smoked PCP and I’m having a bad time.’ So I became more or less agoraphobic because I’d have flashbacks. From 14 to 16, I didn’t have any friends. I stayed home most of the time. Up till then life was pretty great. The world was big and I felt I could do anything I wanted. Suddenly, I felt like I couldn’t do anything. But in the isolation, my imagination really had time to run. I never did any drugs until my late 20s. Unfortunately, being a child of two alcoholics, I started drinking a lot, and that’s what eventually got me back into drugs. You often hear that pot leads to harder drugs. But I think alcohol is what leads you to everything, because it takes away the fear. The worst drug experimentation I ever did was because I was drunk and didn’t care.”

Benzo Buddies orders terrified addict to ignore doctor, reject psychiatric medication

Hello, My Story
« on: August 17, 2018, 01:25:54 pm »

[Buddie]

Hi. I’m in a bad situation because I decided to smoke weed with friends about three months ago and only one hit threw me into a mood frenzy. I was an insomniac for a week after, non stop crying, paranoid, and panic attacks. So I managed to get 1mg Xanax from a friend which I used for about 14 days at night for sleep to reset my sleep. The last four days, I cut it to .5mg and then .25mg. I then stopped because I felt fine. However, I have been having up and down mood swings, palpitations that make me fear a heart attack, restlessness, shaking, paranoia, and what feels like chronic fatigue. I fear for my life like the weed may have cause tachycardia or mitral valve prolapse. Is this just from my underlying anxiety or the CT from the xanax? I got a shaky episode the other night and had to use one to stop the tremors and feel it was a bad idea. I see a psychiatrist Monday and I am terrified because I can’t tell the doctor about the weed or the xanax because the medicine was not prescribed to me and I could get in trouble. What do I do? I fear my life may never be the same again. I am weak and tremoring as I write this. What if I’m developing mental illness? The only option is for the psych to prescribe me benzos or ssris. I don’t want either.

Re: Hello, My Story
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2018, 01:37:37 pm »

[Buddie]

Hello […],

Welcome to Benzo Buddies! I’m sorry you had such a severe effect from marijuana. Some strains can in fact increase anxiety, it appears you might have experienced this. Additionally, there might have been other substances in the marijuana that cause your reaction.

You took xanax for about two weeks. The recommended length of time for taking benzos is a maximum of two to three weeks, so you are right in that time frame. You are most likely feeling the effects from stopping xanax. There is likely to be withdrawal effects of some kind after two weeks of use. I do believe that these symptoms should ease up though, it may take a little while though.

If it were me, I would explain to the doctor what started your issues. If you don’t explain the cause, it is likely that the doctor will diagnose you with an anxiety disorder. If you didn’t have issues like this before using marijuana, then the effects you felt were due to the weed.

Your central nervous system took a hit with the marijuana and xanax. It may take a little while for things to settle, but they will. Try to distract from what you feel so that the fear doesn’t cause more issues.

I’ll give you a link to the Ashton Manual. It is an excellent resource about benzos and how to withdraw. It was written by Dr. Heather Ashton, an expert in the field. The manual does discuss tapering in detail but IMO, I would not suggest this for you. If it were me, I’d stay away from benzos and allow my body to recover.

I’ll also give you a link to the Post Withdrawal Recovery Board where you can post and receive feedback from members.

Your life will be the same, once your system recovers. I know this can be frightening, I felt the same way when I was directed to stop ativan for a medical test. I’m glad you’ve joined, you’ll find a lot of good information and support here. It’s going to be OK.

The Ashton Manual

Post-withdrawal Recovery Support

[…]  :)

Re: Hello, My Story
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2018, 02:13:00 pm »

[Buddie]

Thanks. If my psych has to give me something, what would be the best route as I am terrified of those withdrawals as well?

Re: Hello, My Story
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2018, 06:29:15 pm »

[Buddie]

Quote from: [Buddie] on August 17, 2018, 02:13:00 pm
Thanks. If my psych has to give me something, what would be the best route as I am terrified of those withdrawals as well?

You don’t have to take any medication if offered. It is your body and you can make the decision as to what to put in it. I didn’t even know what a benzo was when I was prescribed it. I had no idea about it’s potential for dependency or withdrawal. I learned a big lesson; be proactive about what I take and question everything.

It’s been my experience that ‘some’ doctors want to medicate everything when there are other alternatives.

[…] :smitten:

Re: Hello, My Story
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2018, 07:04:06 pm »

[Buddie]

Yeah. I also forgot to mention that three days before the weed incident, I CT’d beer completely and for the past year I was drinking three to four to five a day. Could that have something to do with what I am going through maybe?

Crippled by Ashton dogma, Benzo Buddies members unable to watch movies

Infinity war
« on: July 05, 2018, 07:38:52 pm »

[Buddie]

Not sure if this is the relevant place to post this but a few nights ago I tried watching the new Avengers film. I hate missing out on the new releases due to withdrawal and not being able to go to the cinema. Anyways big mistake, wayyyyyyy overstimulating.

Anyways the end was horrific.

Something about that imagery stuck with me. I’ve been in a crippling depression, depersonalised state for ages now and sometimes it really feels like my body is just disintegrating from the inside. I think in my currently altered state it is hard to escape the negative feelings, so strangely I’m finding parralels in my current situation with the end of a superhero movie. Strange