Excerpts from benzo cult hero Stevie Nicks’ shocking new bio

  • Grammy winning singer-songwriter, Stevie Nicks snorted so much cocaine and became so addicted to the drug that she had to be shadowed to keep from falling off stage when performing and needed to have someone tuck her into bed at night
  • The Queen of Rock and Roll in the 1970s and 1980s not only had a huge hole in her nose from the cocaine, but she was warned of the imminent possibility of a brain hemorrhage if she kept up her high level of consumption
  • But it was the shocking rumors that she had reverted to using the devil’s dandruff in her vagina and rectum for the ultimate high that was the eventual motivation for her to go into rehab in 1986 at the Betty Ford addiction treatment center in Minnesota
  • The Fleetwood Mac singer admitted: “You could put a big gold ring through my septum. It affected my eyes, my sinuses. It was a lot of fun for a long time because we didn’t know it was bad. But eventually it gets hold of you, and all you can think about is where your next line is coming from”
  • “All of us were drug addicts. But there was a point where I was the worst drug addict. I was a girl, I was fragile, and I was doing a lot of coke and I was in danger of brain damage,” she told author Stephen Davis for his upcoming book, Gold Dust Woman: The Biography of Stevie Nicks

Benzo Buddies member: “Jennifer Leigh not benzo qualified”

Re: Has anyone here had a consultation with Dr. Jennifer Leigh?
« Reply #17 on: June 27, 2017, 04:22:38 am »

[Buddie

I must speak. I has contact with this woman years ago. She has no benzodiazepine qualifications. She was unable to comprehend grammar school science. Now she promotes herself as an expert She remains impressed with her uneducated self substituting sidling up to people whom she considers prominent. Syncophant. Potential buyers, beware. She is unqualified Soothing words with authoritative airs are not worth $100 an hour up front yet!

Benzos not to blame for singer’s death

Ativan cures migraines

The effectiveness of ibuprofen and lorazepam combination therapy in treating the symptoms of acute Migraine: A randomized clinical trial.

CONCLUSIONS: Given the greater effectiveness of combination therapy with Ibuprofen and Lorazepam in alleviating the symptoms of acute migraine compared to single-drug treatments with Ibuprofen, Lorazepam is recommended to be used as a first line treatment for acute migraine.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/28461864/?i=10&from=ativan